Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

Is it a Good Idea to Give a Puppy as a Christmablog

Is it a Good Idea to Give a Puppy as a Christmablog

Getting gifts is always fun and Christmas gifts are always better.  You and the family are sitting around the Christmas tree, ripping wrapping off as quickly as possible to see “what you got”.  Sometimes you get good stuff like toys, electronics, phones, etc. and sometimes you get bad stuff like socks or self-help CD’s.  The good thing about the socks and the CD’s is that you can often return them for more good stuff.

So, what happens when there is a puppy under the tree?  What happens then?  First of all, who doesn’t love puppies?  Your first inclination is that your “surprise” Christmas Puppy falls into the “good stuff” category.  You are going to play with him, show him to all your friends, have him on the sofa while you watch TV, etc.  He is the perfect friend who will do everything you want and will always be happy. Many times, this is the case.  Everything is great.

The problem is that a puppy is not a toy, piece of electronics, or a new phone.  There is no “off switch” on a puppy and you just can’t put them away on the top shelf of the hall closet.  A puppy is 24/7 for ten to fifteen years.  Although wonderful, cuddly, and lovable, they do have their challenges.  These challenges include potty training, teething, bad behavior, the need for socialization, and more.

Many new puppy owners are either prepared for these challenges or are ready to step up and deal with them.  Unfortunately, other new puppy owners may have been “blind-sided” with the newfound knowledge of these issues.  It isn’t that they are bad people.  They might not have the time to deal with the issues, can’t physically deal with the issues, or just don’t have the appropriate temperament to deal with the issues.

When a new puppy owner can’t deal with a new puppy, bad things always happen.  They may inappropriately deal with the puppy that scares or even hurts the puppy.  They may give the puppy to a shelter that will further traumatize him.

Robin and I love it when people get new puppies, but we also want to make sure that it is the best course of action for both the puppy and new puppy owner. We have a great puppy training blog that helps you decide the best solution for you. Please take a look at our puppy training blog titled “Is it a Good Idea to Give a Puppy as a Christmas Gift”.

What is needed before giving a puppy as a gift

How Do I Keep My Dog Safe for the Holidays with a House Full of Out of Town Family?

How Do I Keep My Dog Safe for the Holidays with a House Full of Out of Town Family?

The Holidays are always a great time and it is always fun visiting with relatives that we don’t always see on a regular basis.  The problem is that the commingling  of these two events don’t always create a wonderful and happy time.  All the stress and unique situations of The Holidays and the “personal requirements” of our “wonderful and highly loved” out of town relatives can sometimes cause problems.

The good news is that we are “humans” and understand the possibility of these situations and can often diffuse or minimize any problems.  We have to remember; we were the ones inviting our family to stay with us over The Holidays.  We can prepare and get the guest rooms ready. We can make sure the refrigerator is filled with the “special requirements food” of Uncle Bob.  We can put all the breakable stuff away before our cousin’s overactive twins arrive.

The problem is that our dog has no idea what is going on.  Sure, he has experienced friends and guests come to the house many times.  He can make small adjustments such as not sitting on the sofa for a few hours, understanding that tonight’s dinner may be a little later than normal, or that there is no one-on-one playtime this afternoon.  These are simple “hick-ups” in his consistent, daily life.  When it draws out into days and even weeks; that is a whole different story.

How can we deal with the inconsistencies, traumas, and dramas of The Holidays and Holiday house guests and let our dog understand that everything is fine?  It all comes down to management and balance. Robin and I have a great dog training article that explains everything. Please take a look at our Dog Safety Tips titled “How Do I Keep My Dog Safe for the Holidays with a House Full of Out of Town Family”.

Prepare your dog for Christmas house guests

How Do I Prepare My Dog for Long Holiday Car Trips and Roadside Hotel Rooms?

How Do I Prepare My Dog for Long Holiday Car Trips and Roadside Hotel Rooms?

Just as it is with everything, some of us love to travel and some of us would feel just fine if we never had to go farther than the neighborhood grocery store for the rest of our lives.  I personally love the freedom of road trips and hate the confusion and complexity of airports and plane flights.

Even though I like to travel by car rather than plane, it does not mean that I would not use either means of transportation.  It simply means that, after appropriate experiences, I have made a decision of liking one over the other.

So what if I had never experienced a road trip or a plane flight?  I would have no idea what to expect and, because of that, be very nervous of what “strange things” I could encounter.  These “strange things” could be things I may like or they could be very scary things that could even hurt me.  I have no idea.  If I were a risk taker, I would say “Go for it!”  I am not a risk taker and would be very pensive if I had to encounter this new experience.

Dogs crave safety.  They learn through repetition and consistency.  From their perspective, throwing them into something completely new and different does not guarantee their safety or give them the ability to learn that it may be safe.

A “Road Trip” with all the unique sights and smells, strange experiences in hotel rooms, being left alone, unknown people, etc. can be a terrifying time for your dog.  It does not have to be that way. Robin and I have a great dog training article that will help you and your dog have a great Holiday Road Trip. Please read our blog titled “How Do I Prepare My Dog for Long Holiday Car Trips and Roadside Hotel Rooms”.

Prepare Your Dog for the Holiday Road Trip and Hotel Rooms

How Important is Playtime with my Dog?

How Important is Playtime with my Dog?

As “adult human beings”, we often think of “playtime” as did when we were children.  It was the time that we could do whatever we wanted with our friends and just be happy.  We weren’t listening to our parents or other grown-ups and just had fun.  Most importantly, we weren’t in school doing extremely boring English lessons or really, really hard math problems.

When we start to dig down into the concept of “playtime”, as grown-ups, we understand that our younger perception of “playtime” was not completely accurate.  A lot of things were going on during playtime. We were learning how to interact with other kids.  We were learning rules. There were grown-ups (i.e. teachers, coaches, or parent-helpers) directing and guiding us.  We felt safe and were actually learning about real life.

Luckily, our teachers never mentioned that we were “learning things” during recess or we probably would not have liked it.  We didn’t know it at the time; but playtime was a very important part of our learning process.

So, what is the case when we want to train our dog?  We teach him how to sit, stay, come, place, walk, and many more commands.  We correct him when he jumps, doesn’t listen, or barks too much.  Is this all he needs?  The answer is “No”.

Just like us, our dog needs a good amount of playtime to teach him about the real world.  Playtime allows our dog to socialize and gain his “street smarts”. Robin and I have a great dog training article that explains all of this and walks you through the appropriate steps for your dog’s playtime.  Please check out our dog training article titled “How Important is Playtime with my Dog”.

Playtime is important for your dog's learning process

How Should I Safely Approach and Greet a Dog on the Street?

How Should I Safely Approach and Greet a Dog on the Street?

I am sure that many of us have approached dogs that seemed nice at first and then, all of a sudden, became agitated, barked, jumped, and even gave us a nip.  We had no idea why such a thing would happen.  We thought the dog looked just fine and we believed that we were doing nothing less than being polite to the dog.  Wham, bam; we get scared, jumped on, and possibly bitten!

On top of everything that I just mentioned, many people have told me that this has happened more than once.  Even though they may not have seen a pattern of what caused the bad situation, they should have seen a pattern of coming up to a strange dog and bad things can happen.

In today’s world, we are always ready to blame someone else for something we did.  We went up to a dog and it scared, jumped on, or bit us.  We are going to get mad at the dog and owner who were minding their own business walking down the street.  On the other hand, the dog owner can get mad at us for causing their dog to react to our encroachment. Whatever the case, the end result was not what “dog owner”, “dog”, or “person wanting to see and pet dog” expected then they left for a walk.

As with many dog/human problems, the issues lies in communication, observation, and interpretation. Since many of us have lived with dogs all our lives, we often mistakenly think that dogs should think, and act like us.  Why not?  They live in our homes, play with our family, eat with us, go on vacations with us, etc.

Although dogs and humans are gathering, social creatures and have similar “rules of engagement”, our delivery of those rules can be very different.  We verbalize and adhere to rational thought processes.  Dogs rely on body language and consistent, repetitive actions.

Robin and I have a great article that focuses on an appropriate greeting from your dog’s point of view.  Please take a moment and read our dog training blog titled “How Should I Safely Approach and Greet a Dog on the Street”.

How to Greet a Dog on the Street and not be Bitten

What Are Some Halloween Tips for an Already Scary Year?

What Are Some Halloween Tips for an Already Scary Year?

Although Halloween is not the most popular holiday in the US, it sure feels like it is really close.  As soon as Labor Day weekend is over, all the Halloween decorations, costumes, and candy start to appear in the stores.  You walk into Home Depot and the first thing you see are twelve-foot-high ghosts, witches, and Frankenstein Monsters.

We love scary things and love to be scared.  But, what do our dogs feel about the entire event?  Let’s think about this for a moment.  All year long I have talked to you about keeping your dog safe, secure, and happy.  I have focused on the ideas of consistency, repetition, and bonding relationships.

Halloween is not a time where any of these things take place.  All of a sudden, our dog’s world is turned upside down and our actions, in our dog’s eyes, are completely nuts.  This does not make him a happy camper. All the social actions that he needs to experience to maintain his appropriate state of mind are instantly gone and replaced with everything that tells him that “all is not good”.

As responsible dog owners, we cannot allow this to happen to our dog.  But, as family members with children and “adults that act like children”, we really want to take part of all the scary and weird things that Halloween festivities often offer.

On top of all these things, we have been thrown a “special problem” for 2020.  We need to  decide if we are even going to have a Halloween.  If we do, we need to make sure that we can have a good time while affirming that everyone will be happy and remain well.

So we need to have happy and safe dogs while worrying about COVID.  Sounds impossible, but it is not.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that can allow you to have the best Halloween ever.  Please take a look at our dog training blog titled “What Are Some Halloween Tips for an Already Scary Year”.

Halloween tips for your dog and family

Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

Is it a Good Idea to Give a Puppy as a Christmablog

Is it a Good Idea to Give a Puppy as a Christmablog

Getting gifts is always fun and Christmas gifts are always better.  You and the family are sitting around the Christmas tree, ripping wrapping off as quickly as possible to see “what you got”.  Sometimes you get good stuff like toys, electronics, phones, etc. and sometimes you get bad stuff like socks or self-help CD’s.  The good thing about the socks and the CD’s is that you can often return them for more good stuff.

So, what happens when there is a puppy under the tree?  What happens then?  First of all, who doesn’t love puppies?  Your first inclination is that your “surprise” Christmas Puppy falls into the “good stuff” category.  You are going to play with him, show him to all your friends, have him on the sofa while you watch TV, etc.  He is the perfect friend who will do everything you want and will always be happy. Many times, this is the case.  Everything is great.

The problem is that a puppy is not a toy, piece of electronics, or a new phone.  There is no “off switch” on a puppy and you just can’t put them away on the top shelf of the hall closet.  A puppy is 24/7 for ten to fifteen years.  Although wonderful, cuddly, and lovable, they do have their challenges.  These challenges include potty training, teething, bad behavior, the need for socialization, and more.

Many new puppy owners are either prepared for these challenges or are ready to step up and deal with them.  Unfortunately, other new puppy owners may have been “blind-sided” with the newfound knowledge of these issues.  It isn’t that they are bad people.  They might not have the time to deal with the issues, can’t physically deal with the issues, or just don’t have the appropriate temperament to deal with the issues.

When a new puppy owner can’t deal with a new puppy, bad things always happen.  They may inappropriately deal with the puppy that scares or even hurts the puppy.  They may give the puppy to a shelter that will further traumatize him.

Robin and I love it when people get new puppies, but we also want to make sure that it is the best course of action for both the puppy and new puppy owner. We have a great puppy training blog that helps you decide the best solution for you. Please take a look at our puppy training blog titled “Is it a Good Idea to Give a Puppy as a Christmas Gift”.

What is needed before giving a puppy as a gift

How Do I Keep My Dog Safe for the Holidays with a House Full of Out of Town Family?

How Do I Keep My Dog Safe for the Holidays with a House Full of Out of Town Family?

The Holidays are always a great time and it is always fun visiting with relatives that we don’t always see on a regular basis.  The problem is that the commingling  of these two events don’t always create a wonderful and happy time.  All the stress and unique situations of The Holidays and the “personal requirements” of our “wonderful and highly loved” out of town relatives can sometimes cause problems.

The good news is that we are “humans” and understand the possibility of these situations and can often diffuse or minimize any problems.  We have to remember; we were the ones inviting our family to stay with us over The Holidays.  We can prepare and get the guest rooms ready. We can make sure the refrigerator is filled with the “special requirements food” of Uncle Bob.  We can put all the breakable stuff away before our cousin’s overactive twins arrive.

The problem is that our dog has no idea what is going on.  Sure, he has experienced friends and guests come to the house many times.  He can make small adjustments such as not sitting on the sofa for a few hours, understanding that tonight’s dinner may be a little later than normal, or that there is no one-on-one playtime this afternoon.  These are simple “hick-ups” in his consistent, daily life.  When it draws out into days and even weeks; that is a whole different story.

How can we deal with the inconsistencies, traumas, and dramas of The Holidays and Holiday house guests and let our dog understand that everything is fine?  It all comes down to management and balance. Robin and I have a great dog training article that explains everything. Please take a look at our Dog Safety Tips titled “How Do I Keep My Dog Safe for the Holidays with a House Full of Out of Town Family”.

Prepare your dog for Christmas house guests

How Do I Prepare My Dog for Long Holiday Car Trips and Roadside Hotel Rooms?

How Do I Prepare My Dog for Long Holiday Car Trips and Roadside Hotel Rooms?

Just as it is with everything, some of us love to travel and some of us would feel just fine if we never had to go farther than the neighborhood grocery store for the rest of our lives.  I personally love the freedom of road trips and hate the confusion and complexity of airports and plane flights.

Even though I like to travel by car rather than plane, it does not mean that I would not use either means of transportation.  It simply means that, after appropriate experiences, I have made a decision of liking one over the other.

So what if I had never experienced a road trip or a plane flight?  I would have no idea what to expect and, because of that, be very nervous of what “strange things” I could encounter.  These “strange things” could be things I may like or they could be very scary things that could even hurt me.  I have no idea.  If I were a risk taker, I would say “Go for it!”  I am not a risk taker and would be very pensive if I had to encounter this new experience.

Dogs crave safety.  They learn through repetition and consistency.  From their perspective, throwing them into something completely new and different does not guarantee their safety or give them the ability to learn that it may be safe.

A “Road Trip” with all the unique sights and smells, strange experiences in hotel rooms, being left alone, unknown people, etc. can be a terrifying time for your dog.  It does not have to be that way. Robin and I have a great dog training article that will help you and your dog have a great Holiday Road Trip. Please read our blog titled “How Do I Prepare My Dog for Long Holiday Car Trips and Roadside Hotel Rooms”.

Prepare Your Dog for the Holiday Road Trip and Hotel Rooms

How Important is Playtime with my Dog?

How Important is Playtime with my Dog?

As “adult human beings”, we often think of “playtime” as did when we were children.  It was the time that we could do whatever we wanted with our friends and just be happy.  We weren’t listening to our parents or other grown-ups and just had fun.  Most importantly, we weren’t in school doing extremely boring English lessons or really, really hard math problems.

When we start to dig down into the concept of “playtime”, as grown-ups, we understand that our younger perception of “playtime” was not completely accurate.  A lot of things were going on during playtime. We were learning how to interact with other kids.  We were learning rules. There were grown-ups (i.e. teachers, coaches, or parent-helpers) directing and guiding us.  We felt safe and were actually learning about real life.

Luckily, our teachers never mentioned that we were “learning things” during recess or we probably would not have liked it.  We didn’t know it at the time; but playtime was a very important part of our learning process.

So, what is the case when we want to train our dog?  We teach him how to sit, stay, come, place, walk, and many more commands.  We correct him when he jumps, doesn’t listen, or barks too much.  Is this all he needs?  The answer is “No”.

Just like us, our dog needs a good amount of playtime to teach him about the real world.  Playtime allows our dog to socialize and gain his “street smarts”. Robin and I have a great dog training article that explains all of this and walks you through the appropriate steps for your dog’s playtime.  Please check out our dog training article titled “How Important is Playtime with my Dog”.

Playtime is important for your dog's learning process

How Should I Safely Approach and Greet a Dog on the Street?

How Should I Safely Approach and Greet a Dog on the Street?

I am sure that many of us have approached dogs that seemed nice at first and then, all of a sudden, became agitated, barked, jumped, and even gave us a nip.  We had no idea why such a thing would happen.  We thought the dog looked just fine and we believed that we were doing nothing less than being polite to the dog.  Wham, bam; we get scared, jumped on, and possibly bitten!

On top of everything that I just mentioned, many people have told me that this has happened more than once.  Even though they may not have seen a pattern of what caused the bad situation, they should have seen a pattern of coming up to a strange dog and bad things can happen.

In today’s world, we are always ready to blame someone else for something we did.  We went up to a dog and it scared, jumped on, or bit us.  We are going to get mad at the dog and owner who were minding their own business walking down the street.  On the other hand, the dog owner can get mad at us for causing their dog to react to our encroachment. Whatever the case, the end result was not what “dog owner”, “dog”, or “person wanting to see and pet dog” expected then they left for a walk.

As with many dog/human problems, the issues lies in communication, observation, and interpretation. Since many of us have lived with dogs all our lives, we often mistakenly think that dogs should think, and act like us.  Why not?  They live in our homes, play with our family, eat with us, go on vacations with us, etc.

Although dogs and humans are gathering, social creatures and have similar “rules of engagement”, our delivery of those rules can be very different.  We verbalize and adhere to rational thought processes.  Dogs rely on body language and consistent, repetitive actions.

Robin and I have a great article that focuses on an appropriate greeting from your dog’s point of view.  Please take a moment and read our dog training blog titled “How Should I Safely Approach and Greet a Dog on the Street”.

How to Greet a Dog on the Street and not be Bitten

What Are Some Halloween Tips for an Already Scary Year?

What Are Some Halloween Tips for an Already Scary Year?

Although Halloween is not the most popular holiday in the US, it sure feels like it is really close.  As soon as Labor Day weekend is over, all the Halloween decorations, costumes, and candy start to appear in the stores.  You walk into Home Depot and the first thing you see are twelve-foot-high ghosts, witches, and Frankenstein Monsters.

We love scary things and love to be scared.  But, what do our dogs feel about the entire event?  Let’s think about this for a moment.  All year long I have talked to you about keeping your dog safe, secure, and happy.  I have focused on the ideas of consistency, repetition, and bonding relationships.

Halloween is not a time where any of these things take place.  All of a sudden, our dog’s world is turned upside down and our actions, in our dog’s eyes, are completely nuts.  This does not make him a happy camper. All the social actions that he needs to experience to maintain his appropriate state of mind are instantly gone and replaced with everything that tells him that “all is not good”.

As responsible dog owners, we cannot allow this to happen to our dog.  But, as family members with children and “adults that act like children”, we really want to take part of all the scary and weird things that Halloween festivities often offer.

On top of all these things, we have been thrown a “special problem” for 2020.  We need to  decide if we are even going to have a Halloween.  If we do, we need to make sure that we can have a good time while affirming that everyone will be happy and remain well.

So we need to have happy and safe dogs while worrying about COVID.  Sounds impossible, but it is not.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that can allow you to have the best Halloween ever.  Please take a look at our dog training blog titled “What Are Some Halloween Tips for an Already Scary Year”.

Halloween tips for your dog and family