Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

How Should My Dog Ride in the Car with Me?

We Americans love our cars and spend many hours each day driving from one place to another.  Our cars are great because they have been designed for our safety and enjoyment in mind.

The seats in our cars are really comfortable.  The sound system makes us feel like we are in the middle of an orchestra hall.  The temperature is perfect, and the big windows give us a wonderful view of the world whisking past us.

On top of all this, our cars are designed to keep us as safe as possible.  There are seat belts, air bags, shatter-proof glass, crunch zones, and much, much more.

None of these things were specifically designed to keep our dogs safe and happy.  That is our job. Robin and I have a great article that will allow you to keep your dog safe and happy in the car as you are doing the same. Please check out our dog training article titled “How Should My Dog Ride in the Car with Me”.

Have your dog safe and happy in the car

How Can I Stop My Dog from Counter Surfing and Stealing Food?

Dogs live in a world where they understand a hierarchy of leadership, responsibility, and privilege.  When their perception of leadership is properly established, they will naturally obey the rules and follow the appropriate protocols.

When it comes to food, a “follower dog” would never think of challenging the “leader dog” for their food.  Because they equate leadership with power, safety, and strength; challenging the leader for their food would only end up in a very bad situation for them.  I could end up from a few cuts and bruises to complete ostracization from the pack.  None of this is worth a piece of food.

The problem is that we often give our dogs signals that it is OK to go for the food.  We give off signals that “we don’t want the food anymore”.  It is no longer our food, so they can have it.  Remember, we don’t know we are doing this and, in reality, still want the food.

Our dog “swoops in” thinking he has the “green light” and that is where the problems start to escalate. Robin and I have a great dog training article that explains where the disconnect is taking place and what you can do to easily remedy the situation. Please take a look at our dog training article titled “How Can I Stop My Dog from Counter Surfing and Stealing Food”.

You can easily train your dog not to counter surf or steal food

Isn’t It Mean to Put a Muzzle on My Dog or Any Dog?

Many people hear the term “dog muzzle” and start to get all agitated about being mean and trying to scare and hurt your dog.  In reality, this is not the case.

Our dogs want to be safe, secure, healthy, and part of a group.  It is our job to provide these things to our dogs in a way that is easy for them to understand and quickly learn.  We must keep them healthy, safe, and secure.

If our dogs are nipping or biting, it is our duty to create an environment that will allow them to stop these actions.  Our methods can not be hurtful, scary, or confusing.

The Baskerville Muzzle is a tool that we can easily use with our dogs.  It does not hurt or scare them.  It does not put their health at risk.  All it does is to calmly direct them to the right decision.  That is what a good teacher always tries to accomplish.  To learn more about this topic, please read our dog training blog titled “Isn’t It Mean to Put a Muzzle on My Dog or Any Dog?”

The Baskerville Muzzle is a great training tool for you and your dog

What Can I Do About My Dog’s Separation Anxiety?

It is pretty easy to spot your dog’s separation anxiety.  You come home after a long day at work and find your house all torn up.  The base boards and door frame are all chewed up, your sofa pillows look like they were hit with a shot gun, and papers are scattered all over the place. You then notice a nasty note from your next-door neighbor on your front door about your barking dog. It is a pretty good bet that your dog is experiencing separation anxiety.

The bad news is that it is difficult to understand why your dog may be experiencing separation anxiety.  The good news is that there are systematic, dog training steps you can take to modify your dog’s behavior and direct them away from this fear.

The first step you must take is to identify the trigger of your dog’s present actions.  Once this is accomplished, you need to create a plan to mitigate the trigger and redirect your dog to a more appropriate focus.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that can help you accomplish this.  Please read our article titled “What Can I Do About My Dog’s Separation Anxiety”.

Separation anxiety requires simple steps to redirect your dog's misplaced focus

How Can I Easily Teach My Dog to Come All the Time?

One dog training mistake that many people make when training their dog is to not provide a complete and repeatable lesson plan for their dog.  They think that if their dog comes to them every once in a while, their dog knows how to some.  Is that really coming or simply a lucky coincidence?

All dogs learn through slow and consistent repetition.  For all of you that can instantly answer the math problem “What is seven times eight?” without the use of the calculator on your phone; you understand the concept. We learned our times tables by practicing the same thing over and over again.  We started with the “easy numbers” like “one times” or “ten times” and worked our way to the harder numbers like “seven times” or “eight times”.

We need to build a dog training lesson plan that encompasses everything from our dog not having a clue of how to come to us to the point where he will come to us the moment we issue the command.  This takes a little work on our part, but we will always succeed if we follow this process.

Robin and I have created a great dog training article that will explain all of this for you. Please check out or dog trainer blog article titled “How Can I Easily Teach My Dog to Come All the Time”.

Teach your dog to come to you every time

How Do I Get My Dog to Like His Crate?

Most of us (humans) have a strange aversion to using crates with our dogs.  We look at them as jail cells or equate them to a place for “time outs”.  The problem is that we are imparting our feelings and beliefs to a thing and not understanding how our dog would normally feel towards such a place.

Dogs, like us, need a place where they feel safe and secure.  When we were young, and often as long as we live, it is when we are holding our mommy’s hand.  No matter what happens, we know that things will be fine.  Mommy will always make sure that is the case.

Our dogs approach this feeling from a more canine perspective.  Although there is the concept of the “leader of the pack”, there is also a strong feeling of the den or cave.  Once they are in that place, everything, no matter what, will be fine.

The crate is the natural place to establish that safe feeling of the cave or den.  Establishing this feeling with your dog can be a very simple process.  All you need to do is to understand some simple social and behavioral steps to undertake and all will be well.  Please take a look of an article we have recently published on our blog.  The title is “How Do I Get My Dog to Like His Crate”.

Teach your puppy to love his crate

Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

How Should My Dog Ride in the Car with Me?

We Americans love our cars and spend many hours each day driving from one place to another.  Our cars are great because they have been designed for our safety and enjoyment in mind.

The seats in our cars are really comfortable.  The sound system makes us feel like we are in the middle of an orchestra hall.  The temperature is perfect, and the big windows give us a wonderful view of the world whisking past us.

On top of all this, our cars are designed to keep us as safe as possible.  There are seat belts, air bags, shatter-proof glass, crunch zones, and much, much more.

None of these things were specifically designed to keep our dogs safe and happy.  That is our job. Robin and I have a great article that will allow you to keep your dog safe and happy in the car as you are doing the same. Please check out our dog training article titled “How Should My Dog Ride in the Car with Me”.

Have your dog safe and happy in the car

How Can I Stop My Dog from Counter Surfing and Stealing Food?

Dogs live in a world where they understand a hierarchy of leadership, responsibility, and privilege.  When their perception of leadership is properly established, they will naturally obey the rules and follow the appropriate protocols.

When it comes to food, a “follower dog” would never think of challenging the “leader dog” for their food.  Because they equate leadership with power, safety, and strength; challenging the leader for their food would only end up in a very bad situation for them.  I could end up from a few cuts and bruises to complete ostracization from the pack.  None of this is worth a piece of food.

The problem is that we often give our dogs signals that it is OK to go for the food.  We give off signals that “we don’t want the food anymore”.  It is no longer our food, so they can have it.  Remember, we don’t know we are doing this and, in reality, still want the food.

Our dog “swoops in” thinking he has the “green light” and that is where the problems start to escalate. Robin and I have a great dog training article that explains where the disconnect is taking place and what you can do to easily remedy the situation. Please take a look at our dog training article titled “How Can I Stop My Dog from Counter Surfing and Stealing Food”.

You can easily train your dog not to counter surf or steal food

Isn’t It Mean to Put a Muzzle on My Dog or Any Dog?

Many people hear the term “dog muzzle” and start to get all agitated about being mean and trying to scare and hurt your dog.  In reality, this is not the case.

Our dogs want to be safe, secure, healthy, and part of a group.  It is our job to provide these things to our dogs in a way that is easy for them to understand and quickly learn.  We must keep them healthy, safe, and secure.

If our dogs are nipping or biting, it is our duty to create an environment that will allow them to stop these actions.  Our methods can not be hurtful, scary, or confusing.

The Baskerville Muzzle is a tool that we can easily use with our dogs.  It does not hurt or scare them.  It does not put their health at risk.  All it does is to calmly direct them to the right decision.  That is what a good teacher always tries to accomplish.  To learn more about this topic, please read our dog training blog titled “Isn’t It Mean to Put a Muzzle on My Dog or Any Dog?”

The Baskerville Muzzle is a great training tool for you and your dog

What Can I Do About My Dog’s Separation Anxiety?

It is pretty easy to spot your dog’s separation anxiety.  You come home after a long day at work and find your house all torn up.  The base boards and door frame are all chewed up, your sofa pillows look like they were hit with a shot gun, and papers are scattered all over the place. You then notice a nasty note from your next-door neighbor on your front door about your barking dog. It is a pretty good bet that your dog is experiencing separation anxiety.

The bad news is that it is difficult to understand why your dog may be experiencing separation anxiety.  The good news is that there are systematic, dog training steps you can take to modify your dog’s behavior and direct them away from this fear.

The first step you must take is to identify the trigger of your dog’s present actions.  Once this is accomplished, you need to create a plan to mitigate the trigger and redirect your dog to a more appropriate focus.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that can help you accomplish this.  Please read our article titled “What Can I Do About My Dog’s Separation Anxiety”.

Separation anxiety requires simple steps to redirect your dog's misplaced focus

How Can I Easily Teach My Dog to Come All the Time?

One dog training mistake that many people make when training their dog is to not provide a complete and repeatable lesson plan for their dog.  They think that if their dog comes to them every once in a while, their dog knows how to some.  Is that really coming or simply a lucky coincidence?

All dogs learn through slow and consistent repetition.  For all of you that can instantly answer the math problem “What is seven times eight?” without the use of the calculator on your phone; you understand the concept. We learned our times tables by practicing the same thing over and over again.  We started with the “easy numbers” like “one times” or “ten times” and worked our way to the harder numbers like “seven times” or “eight times”.

We need to build a dog training lesson plan that encompasses everything from our dog not having a clue of how to come to us to the point where he will come to us the moment we issue the command.  This takes a little work on our part, but we will always succeed if we follow this process.

Robin and I have created a great dog training article that will explain all of this for you. Please check out or dog trainer blog article titled “How Can I Easily Teach My Dog to Come All the Time”.

Teach your dog to come to you every time

How Do I Get My Dog to Like His Crate?

Most of us (humans) have a strange aversion to using crates with our dogs.  We look at them as jail cells or equate them to a place for “time outs”.  The problem is that we are imparting our feelings and beliefs to a thing and not understanding how our dog would normally feel towards such a place.

Dogs, like us, need a place where they feel safe and secure.  When we were young, and often as long as we live, it is when we are holding our mommy’s hand.  No matter what happens, we know that things will be fine.  Mommy will always make sure that is the case.

Our dogs approach this feeling from a more canine perspective.  Although there is the concept of the “leader of the pack”, there is also a strong feeling of the den or cave.  Once they are in that place, everything, no matter what, will be fine.

The crate is the natural place to establish that safe feeling of the cave or den.  Establishing this feeling with your dog can be a very simple process.  All you need to do is to understand some simple social and behavioral steps to undertake and all will be well.  Please take a look of an article we have recently published on our blog.  The title is “How Do I Get My Dog to Like His Crate”.

Teach your puppy to love his crate