Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

What Precautions Should I Take When Playing with My Dog in the Summer Heat? 

After a cold winter where we had to stay inside or be all bundled up when we wandered into our back yard, the warm and sunny days of summer seem like a blessing.  We can go outside, run and play, and enjoy the sun on our face (with the appropriate amount of sunscreen).  We go to the beach and lie on the sand and think that is the best thing in the world.

All this may be great for us because we are humans.  Our bodies have a great heat regulation and dissipation system called “sweating out of every pore of our body” (i.e. “sweating like a pig”). The moisture on our skin is chilled by air or wind passing over it and our body can cool down.

This is not the same with our dogs; not at all. Our dogs “pant”. This is an action where they open their mouth and cause air to pass over their moist tongue to cause cooling.  The problem is that the surface area of their tongue is very small compared to their size.  If they get really hot, they will quickly overheat and their natural resources can’t do a thing about it.

If we are outside in the summer heat playing with our dogs, their natural instinct for companionship and social interaction will cause them to “keep going” until they can become dangerously overheated.  They do not have the capacity to recover and the consequences can be horrible.

We must regulate our outside summer activities to protect our dogs.  We must also fulfill our dog’s need for companionship, social interaction, and healthy exercise.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that will help with all of these things. Please read our dog training and safety blog titled “What Precautions Should I Take When Playing with My Dog in the Summer Heat”.

Keep your dog safe in the summer heat

How Can I Keep My Dog Safe and Happy this 4th of July?

Even though Memorial Day is called “The Official First Fay of Summer’, it always felt like The Fourth of July was the first real Summer holiday.  I remember being around the pool with all my friends, the smell of lighter fluid on the barbecue, hot dogs, Coke, and all sorts of firecrackers, sparklers, and fireworks.  We had some of the smaller fireworks for the yard and then there were the really big, bright, and loud fireworks that came from the park behind us.

These were great memories and we still love this great holiday.  The problem is that these same experiences that we love can be very frightening and dangerous for our dogs.  For most of the year, our dogs are happy and love to do anything we are doing.  This is because our actions are normally predictable and repetitive. This give our dogs time to socialize, learn, and accept our actions.  They learn that all is fine and join in.

Strange people, unusual actions, loud noises, and blinding flashes are not “normal things” from our dog’s perspective. These things can scare, frighten, and even hurt him.  He normally responds through fear and timidity to let us know “Hey, that is enough”.  Since we are too busy ‘having fun”, we don’t properly understand our dog’s communication. Our dog will often escalate his communication through fear and escape.

We need to understand how to make The Fourth of July a safe and happy time for our dog.  Robin and I have a great dog training article titled “How Can I Keep My Dog Safe and Happy this 4th of July” that can help you with the upcoming holiday.

July 4th safety tips for you and your dog

How Can I Be Sure My Dog Will Be Safe at the Vet Hospital (Part 2)?

If you haven’t already read our previous blog, we sincerely hope you will read that before you check out the great information we are presenting now.

In our prior article, we discussed how to prepare your dog for the trip and the proper steps needed to transport him to the Vet Hospital.  We also discussed how you could keep your dog safe and secure while in the waiting room before the Vet or Vet Tech took you to the Examination Room.

Now we want to discuss the Examination Room.  The problem here is that dog owners either “let their guard down” when going into the Examination Room or they become “nervous nellies” with their dog.  Both of these emotions by the dog owner can greatly heighten the dog’s tension and sometimes lead to fearful aggressive acts.

The Examination Room is normally pretty small and cramped.  There is not a lot of room for mistakes and overlooked warning signs.  The good news is that there are some simple steps to keep the Examination Room experience productive and safe for your dog, the Vet, the Vet Tech, and your dog. Our current article discusses all this and follows up on our previous Hospital Safety discussion. Please read our dog safety and training article titled “How Can I Be Sure My Dog Will Be Safe at the Vet Hospital (Part 2)”.

Keep your dog safe at the Vet Hospital

How Can I Be Sure My Dog Will Be Safe at the Vet Hospital (Part 1)?

It is very important that you take your dog to the Vet at least once a year to make sure he is healthy and strong. The reason that it is important is because we often miss little warning signs impacting our dog’s health because we think “Oh, that’s is the way he always is…”.

I am sure that we don’t need to be doctors of veterinarians to agree with the statement that it is far easier to catch a problem when it is small or about to happen instead of waiting until you are in an emergency situation.  On another note, it is also a lot less expensive to fix a problem when it is small.

In this dog training and safety blog, Robin and I discuss how to prepare and transport your dog to the Veterinary Hospital for his checkup.  There are right ways and wrong ways; and the right way is just as easy as the wrong way.

Once you are at the Veterinary Hospital, it can be a very strange and scary time for your dog.  The waiting room can be very daunting for you and your dog.  Again, there are some very simple steps you can take to make sure that everything is fine.  Please take a moment to learn more by reading our dog training blog titled “How Can I Be Sure My Dog Will Be Safe at the Vet Hospital (Part 1).”  You will notice that this is Part 1. There  is even more great information to come!

Keep your dog safe at the Vet Hospital

Why is My Puppy Getting into So Much Mischief?

I think that we all can agree that the best part of puppies is their unconditional love and affection.  This, coupled with their natural high energy, makes them really fun to play with.  As with all children, puppies and humans included, child play is the first form of learning and socialization.

The one problem that we all experience with our puppies is that they can misbehave.  This doesn’t necessarily mean that they are bad or vindictive.  It simply means that as they are “going through the list of things they can do at that moment”, they have picked one that we don’t accept and is breaking our rules.

Even though your puppy is doing that “mischievous thing”, he has no idea that you think it is wrong.  That is because all puppies and dogs want to please and fit in with the group.  You need to redirect and correct his behavior in order to move him in the right direction for you and your family.

Your puppy can do a lot of mischievous things and you need an answer that can address most or all of them as quickly as possible.  Robin and I have a great and simple answer that can help resolve your puppy’s behavior.  Please read our dog training article titled “Why is My Puppy Getting into So Much Mischief”.

Teach your dog what to do to not get into mischief

What Do I Do with a Crazy Dog and a Long Work Day?

We have received many calls from dog owners over the years that are requesting dog training because their dogs are always hyper-active and wanting to play like “Cowboys and Indians”.  Although these dogs often would benefit from some professional dog training assistance, their hyper-activity does not necessarily indicate that they are being bad and are incorrigible.

I always like to use the example of an “old-fashioned school” where the teacher has let the students out for recess.  The kids are running around the school yard, swinging on the swings, playing kick ball, and just letting off their “natural steam”.  This is a great time for the teacher because it allows her to have a small break.  More importantly, it “reboots the children” to be better students and more effectively learn their lessons when they return.

The reason that they will be better learners is because they have drained their adrenaline and are now ready to focus.  This is the exact same position we try and put our clients in when they are working with their dogs.  Focus is key and a calm student is the requirement.

In today’s world, many dog owners do not have a lot of time to play with their dogs and drain their adrenaline.  It isn’t that they are bad dog owners; the requirements of life are blocking them from having the needed time.

Robin and I have a great suggestion for all these dog owners who want to have great dogs but have very hectic and demanding schedules.  We have written a great article that supplies you with a simple answer to have a great, calm, and focused dog.  Please take a look at our dog training article titled “What Do I Do with a Crazy Dog and a Long Work Day”.

Think about Doggie-Day-Care to help to teach your dog good behavior

Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

What Precautions Should I Take When Playing with My Dog in the Summer Heat? 

After a cold winter where we had to stay inside or be all bundled up when we wandered into our back yard, the warm and sunny days of summer seem like a blessing.  We can go outside, run and play, and enjoy the sun on our face (with the appropriate amount of sunscreen).  We go to the beach and lie on the sand and think that is the best thing in the world.

All this may be great for us because we are humans.  Our bodies have a great heat regulation and dissipation system called “sweating out of every pore of our body” (i.e. “sweating like a pig”). The moisture on our skin is chilled by air or wind passing over it and our body can cool down.

This is not the same with our dogs; not at all. Our dogs “pant”. This is an action where they open their mouth and cause air to pass over their moist tongue to cause cooling.  The problem is that the surface area of their tongue is very small compared to their size.  If they get really hot, they will quickly overheat and their natural resources can’t do a thing about it.

If we are outside in the summer heat playing with our dogs, their natural instinct for companionship and social interaction will cause them to “keep going” until they can become dangerously overheated.  They do not have the capacity to recover and the consequences can be horrible.

We must regulate our outside summer activities to protect our dogs.  We must also fulfill our dog’s need for companionship, social interaction, and healthy exercise.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that will help with all of these things. Please read our dog training and safety blog titled “What Precautions Should I Take When Playing with My Dog in the Summer Heat”.

Keep your dog safe in the summer heat

How Can I Keep My Dog Safe and Happy this 4th of July?

Even though Memorial Day is called “The Official First Fay of Summer’, it always felt like The Fourth of July was the first real Summer holiday.  I remember being around the pool with all my friends, the smell of lighter fluid on the barbecue, hot dogs, Coke, and all sorts of firecrackers, sparklers, and fireworks.  We had some of the smaller fireworks for the yard and then there were the really big, bright, and loud fireworks that came from the park behind us.

These were great memories and we still love this great holiday.  The problem is that these same experiences that we love can be very frightening and dangerous for our dogs.  For most of the year, our dogs are happy and love to do anything we are doing.  This is because our actions are normally predictable and repetitive. This give our dogs time to socialize, learn, and accept our actions.  They learn that all is fine and join in.

Strange people, unusual actions, loud noises, and blinding flashes are not “normal things” from our dog’s perspective. These things can scare, frighten, and even hurt him.  He normally responds through fear and timidity to let us know “Hey, that is enough”.  Since we are too busy ‘having fun”, we don’t properly understand our dog’s communication. Our dog will often escalate his communication through fear and escape.

We need to understand how to make The Fourth of July a safe and happy time for our dog.  Robin and I have a great dog training article titled “How Can I Keep My Dog Safe and Happy this 4th of July” that can help you with the upcoming holiday.

July 4th safety tips for you and your dog

How Can I Be Sure My Dog Will Be Safe at the Vet Hospital (Part 2)?

If you haven’t already read our previous blog, we sincerely hope you will read that before you check out the great information we are presenting now.

In our prior article, we discussed how to prepare your dog for the trip and the proper steps needed to transport him to the Vet Hospital.  We also discussed how you could keep your dog safe and secure while in the waiting room before the Vet or Vet Tech took you to the Examination Room.

Now we want to discuss the Examination Room.  The problem here is that dog owners either “let their guard down” when going into the Examination Room or they become “nervous nellies” with their dog.  Both of these emotions by the dog owner can greatly heighten the dog’s tension and sometimes lead to fearful aggressive acts.

The Examination Room is normally pretty small and cramped.  There is not a lot of room for mistakes and overlooked warning signs.  The good news is that there are some simple steps to keep the Examination Room experience productive and safe for your dog, the Vet, the Vet Tech, and your dog. Our current article discusses all this and follows up on our previous Hospital Safety discussion. Please read our dog safety and training article titled “How Can I Be Sure My Dog Will Be Safe at the Vet Hospital (Part 2)”.

Keep your dog safe at the Vet Hospital

How Can I Be Sure My Dog Will Be Safe at the Vet Hospital (Part 1)?

It is very important that you take your dog to the Vet at least once a year to make sure he is healthy and strong. The reason that it is important is because we often miss little warning signs impacting our dog’s health because we think “Oh, that’s is the way he always is…”.

I am sure that we don’t need to be doctors of veterinarians to agree with the statement that it is far easier to catch a problem when it is small or about to happen instead of waiting until you are in an emergency situation.  On another note, it is also a lot less expensive to fix a problem when it is small.

In this dog training and safety blog, Robin and I discuss how to prepare and transport your dog to the Veterinary Hospital for his checkup.  There are right ways and wrong ways; and the right way is just as easy as the wrong way.

Once you are at the Veterinary Hospital, it can be a very strange and scary time for your dog.  The waiting room can be very daunting for you and your dog.  Again, there are some very simple steps you can take to make sure that everything is fine.  Please take a moment to learn more by reading our dog training blog titled “How Can I Be Sure My Dog Will Be Safe at the Vet Hospital (Part 1).”  You will notice that this is Part 1. There  is even more great information to come!

Keep your dog safe at the Vet Hospital

Why is My Puppy Getting into So Much Mischief?

I think that we all can agree that the best part of puppies is their unconditional love and affection.  This, coupled with their natural high energy, makes them really fun to play with.  As with all children, puppies and humans included, child play is the first form of learning and socialization.

The one problem that we all experience with our puppies is that they can misbehave.  This doesn’t necessarily mean that they are bad or vindictive.  It simply means that as they are “going through the list of things they can do at that moment”, they have picked one that we don’t accept and is breaking our rules.

Even though your puppy is doing that “mischievous thing”, he has no idea that you think it is wrong.  That is because all puppies and dogs want to please and fit in with the group.  You need to redirect and correct his behavior in order to move him in the right direction for you and your family.

Your puppy can do a lot of mischievous things and you need an answer that can address most or all of them as quickly as possible.  Robin and I have a great and simple answer that can help resolve your puppy’s behavior.  Please read our dog training article titled “Why is My Puppy Getting into So Much Mischief”.

Teach your dog what to do to not get into mischief

What Do I Do with a Crazy Dog and a Long Work Day?

We have received many calls from dog owners over the years that are requesting dog training because their dogs are always hyper-active and wanting to play like “Cowboys and Indians”.  Although these dogs often would benefit from some professional dog training assistance, their hyper-activity does not necessarily indicate that they are being bad and are incorrigible.

I always like to use the example of an “old-fashioned school” where the teacher has let the students out for recess.  The kids are running around the school yard, swinging on the swings, playing kick ball, and just letting off their “natural steam”.  This is a great time for the teacher because it allows her to have a small break.  More importantly, it “reboots the children” to be better students and more effectively learn their lessons when they return.

The reason that they will be better learners is because they have drained their adrenaline and are now ready to focus.  This is the exact same position we try and put our clients in when they are working with their dogs.  Focus is key and a calm student is the requirement.

In today’s world, many dog owners do not have a lot of time to play with their dogs and drain their adrenaline.  It isn’t that they are bad dog owners; the requirements of life are blocking them from having the needed time.

Robin and I have a great suggestion for all these dog owners who want to have great dogs but have very hectic and demanding schedules.  We have written a great article that supplies you with a simple answer to have a great, calm, and focused dog.  Please take a look at our dog training article titled “What Do I Do with a Crazy Dog and a Long Work Day”.

Think about Doggie-Day-Care to help to teach your dog good behavior