Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

What Should I Know Before I Start Training My Dog?

Many dog owners, especially new dog owners, have a very hard time training their dog and getting them to behave.  They may have read all the books on things like “how to get my dog to come and sit”, but what the book says and what their dog does are completely different.

What all those books on Amazon or the group classes at the local Pet Store might teach you are the mechanics of exercises.  Even those “mechanics” can be diverse, giving you many different ways to get your dog to sit and come.  You try all those ways and your dog is still not paying attention and doing something completely different.

Knowing the mechanics is important, but it is not the foundation of the learning process.  To understand this, you need to understand the roles and the responsibilities of all involved.  Think of your dog as the student.  His role and his only role is to respect you and give you focus.  He doesn’t need to know anything at the start.  He is the student and the environment that is established will allow him to learn.

Now it is your turn.  If your dog is the student and you are establishing a learning environment, you must be the teacher.  It is your responsibility to establish “the classroom” that will allow you to provide knowledge and direction to your student (your dog).  It is also your responsibility to establish yourself as “the teacher”.  You must be able to passively gain your dog’s focus and maintain that focus through trust and respect.

These are all things that you must establish and perform before you even begin “the teaching process” of come, sit, stay.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that explains how you establish yourself as the great teacher and not just the “substitute teacher”.  Please read our training blog titled “What Should I Know Before I Start Training My Dog”.

Start Training My Dog

 

What Can I Do If My Dog Doesn’t Eat His Food?

We love our dogs and always want the absolute best for them.  Many times, our family members will complain that we love our dogs more than them.  And, I will have to say, that is usually the case more than most people would like to believe.

Where we will miss doctor appointments because of the lamest excuse, we often take time off of work to make sure our dog gets his annual shots.  We get them to the groomers when we look at ourselves and think “I’ll get a haircut next week.” We research every ingredient in our dog’s food to make sure they are eating the best stuff possible and we grab a three-month-old pop tart on the way out the door and call that “breakfast”.

Bottom line is that we try and to the best for our dogs.  So what do we do when they don’t eat the dog food that is going to keep them living a healthy, happy, and long life?

The one thing we can’t do is to fall into the trap that, as kids, we always tried to play with our parents.  We can’t feed them the equivalent of a Happy Meal or big bowl of ice cream just because they will eat that and not the healthy dinner.  We can’t give into our dogs by feeding them appetizing  but nutrition-less food.

Please let me be clear.  I am not saying that all healthy food doesn’t taste good.  Just like us, some dogs like certain foods, flavors, and tastes over others.  I don’t like Lima beans and some people (I have no idea why) like Lima beans.  The answer is to do something that will make me eat the lima beans.

The answer lies by doing something akin to what our mothers did with us when we were kids and picky eaters.  Robin and I have just modified the details so that it will work with your dogs.  Please take a look at our dog training blog titled “What Can I Do If My Dog Doesn’t Eat His Food”.

Tricks to have your dog eat their dog food

How Do I Train My Puppy to Follow Me Around the House?

Puppies are a wonderful addition to the family.  They are cute, cuddly, and always playful.  They are always excited to see us and always want to be in our laps or wanting us to play with them.  This is the normal state of affairs with puppies because of their natural need for companionship and the want to belong to a group.

The one thing that we have to understand is that we were not our puppy’s “first family”.  His first family was made up of a doggie Mommy and doggie brothers and sisters.  The environment may have been different than the one we are currently offering them.

Where most puppies want to follow us around because close proximity to us reinforces their need for safety and belonging, that is not always the case.  Every puppy is different and their perception of their placement into the world can be different.  They may not want to follow us around.  They may feel safer and happier by “just staying put” in a location of their choosing.

It is important that you build up the bond between you and your puppy so that they feel safe, secure, and part of “the group”.  This is the same feeling that they felt from birth with “their first family”.  This is very important and the subject of many other of my dog training articles.  What I want to discuss today is teaching (encouraging) your puppy to follow you around.

Training can always be compartmentalized into specific categories.  The “teaching to do something” falls into the obedience category and is based  on specific “learning modules”. You need to teach your puppy a set of obedience commands that will have the end result of his following you around.

Robin and I have a great dog training article that goes over all of this. Please take a look at our article titled “How Do I Train My Puppy to Follow Me Around the House”.

Puppy with You

What Do I Do with a Food Aggressive Dog?

Food aggression is often a difficult problem to spot in our dogs.  The reason for this is that most people only have one dog.  They normally put the food down in a far part of the room, another room, or even outside.

When their dog eats alone, there their dog doesn’t feel threatened and they aren’t watching their dog for any tell-tale signs.  This “lack of negative occurrence” allows us to let our guards down and never even think about the possibility of food aggression with our dog.

Our problem is that “the real world” is not static.  Sometimes we move the location where we feed our dog.  We may get another dog or have a family member’s dog over for a play date or to stay for a few days.  The kids may want to go over and give our dog a big hug while he is eating his food. These are all random or rare occurrences that may trigger the aggression.  They are especially dangerous because we have not prepared or even considered that a “bad thing” would happen while our dog is eating.

Food aggression can be caused by things that are going on in our dog’s current life experiences.  These are triggers that are easier for us to spot and address.  Unfortunately, many food aggression issues are caused by prior life experiences.  These negative life experiences may have taken place before we even got our dog.

We need to consider the fact that, even though we haven’t seen it to date, our dog may be food aggressive.  We need to prepare and mitigate situations that may provide unwanted triggers. Robin and I have a great dog training article that explains all of this. Please take a look at our article titled “What Do I Do with a Food Aggressive Dog”.

Food Aggression

What Do I Do When My Dogs Experience Sibling Rivalry?

For all of us who have brothers and sisters, we have experienced and taken part in “Sibling Rivalry”. The actions we undertook were normally childish and self-centered.  We may have locked our sister out of the house or short-sheeted our brother’s bed.  We may have tried to get our brother or sister in trouble with our parents by tattletaling  or offering “little white lies” about things around the house.

In all of these instances, the actions are relatively the same that any person may employ at any time against another.  The difference with “Sibling Rivalry” is that they are always among brothers and sisters with the specific engagement of the parents.  For some reason, we are trying to improve our standing among our siblings through the acceptance of our parents.

The interesting thing is that our dogs can also display Sibling Rivalry.  They can also act out by fighting, stealing, and performing other inappropriate behaviors.  These actions are often against the canine brother or sister but are always performed to create our involvement. This is where the identifying characteristic comes into play.

Our dogs are performing things that they naturally understand will require our involvement.  They are testing us to see how we react to the situation between them and their siblings.  What we do in that situation has the ability to significantly determine the pecking order within “the siblings”.  Robin and I have a great behavioral training process that helps remove the possible physical dangers caused by our dogs’ inappropriate actions and reestablishes us as the strong leaders of the group. Please take a moment to review our dog training article titled ” What Do I Do When My Dogs Experience Sibling Rivalry”.

Sibling Rivalry

What Should I Know About My Dog and Poisons?

We love our dogs and the quality of life we can enjoy when we have happy and healthy dogs as part of our family.  We go out of our way to spend time with them, often more time than we normally spend with our“human” family members.

We research the best and most nutritious food for them and make sure that they are always taken to the Vet for their shots and check-ups. We protect our dogs when they are out and about with us and personally take afront the moment anyone says anything bad about them.

We do everything we can to assure that they live a wonderful and blessed life.  Many times we will even go without essentials for ourselves to make sure they are safe and healthy.  With all this said, why would we leave that big bowl of guacamole dip on the coffee table after watching the Sunday game?  This stuff could make them very sick, or even worse.

Robin and I are constantly teaching (preaching to) our clients that they must always be looking at the world through their dog’s eyes and understand the environment around them to keep their dogs safe and healthy.  We just finished watching the game, had a lot of good food (including the nachos that we covered with guacamole), and our favorite team won the big game.  All is well in our universe.

When we got up from the sofa, we thought to ourselves, “I’ll clean up a little later”.  No big deal, all will be fine; in our universe.  We forget that guacamole can be poisonous to dogs and ours may just lick the bowl if we leave it within his reach.

We forget that there are good things in our world that can be bad things in our dog’s world.  We forget because we may not know, or we were just too distracted with some other human matter.  As loving and responsible dog owners, it is our responsibility to protect our dogs.  We must always be aware of what is safe and harmful in the environment we share with them.

The ingestion of poisons, other harmful chemicals, and some plants are major reasons for our dogs’ sicknesses and deaths.  We need to identify these items and the warning signs of our dogs’ consumption of them.  Robin and I have a great dog safety article that explains all of this.  Please read our dog training article titled “What Should I Know About My Dog and Poisons”.

Dog Poisons

Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

What Should I Know Before I Start Training My Dog?

Many dog owners, especially new dog owners, have a very hard time training their dog and getting them to behave.  They may have read all the books on things like “how to get my dog to come and sit”, but what the book says and what their dog does are completely different.

What all those books on Amazon or the group classes at the local Pet Store might teach you are the mechanics of exercises.  Even those “mechanics” can be diverse, giving you many different ways to get your dog to sit and come.  You try all those ways and your dog is still not paying attention and doing something completely different.

Knowing the mechanics is important, but it is not the foundation of the learning process.  To understand this, you need to understand the roles and the responsibilities of all involved.  Think of your dog as the student.  His role and his only role is to respect you and give you focus.  He doesn’t need to know anything at the start.  He is the student and the environment that is established will allow him to learn.

Now it is your turn.  If your dog is the student and you are establishing a learning environment, you must be the teacher.  It is your responsibility to establish “the classroom” that will allow you to provide knowledge and direction to your student (your dog).  It is also your responsibility to establish yourself as “the teacher”.  You must be able to passively gain your dog’s focus and maintain that focus through trust and respect.

These are all things that you must establish and perform before you even begin “the teaching process” of come, sit, stay.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that explains how you establish yourself as the great teacher and not just the “substitute teacher”.  Please read our training blog titled “What Should I Know Before I Start Training My Dog”.

Start Training My Dog

 

What Can I Do If My Dog Doesn’t Eat His Food?

We love our dogs and always want the absolute best for them.  Many times, our family members will complain that we love our dogs more than them.  And, I will have to say, that is usually the case more than most people would like to believe.

Where we will miss doctor appointments because of the lamest excuse, we often take time off of work to make sure our dog gets his annual shots.  We get them to the groomers when we look at ourselves and think “I’ll get a haircut next week.” We research every ingredient in our dog’s food to make sure they are eating the best stuff possible and we grab a three-month-old pop tart on the way out the door and call that “breakfast”.

Bottom line is that we try and to the best for our dogs.  So what do we do when they don’t eat the dog food that is going to keep them living a healthy, happy, and long life?

The one thing we can’t do is to fall into the trap that, as kids, we always tried to play with our parents.  We can’t feed them the equivalent of a Happy Meal or big bowl of ice cream just because they will eat that and not the healthy dinner.  We can’t give into our dogs by feeding them appetizing  but nutrition-less food.

Please let me be clear.  I am not saying that all healthy food doesn’t taste good.  Just like us, some dogs like certain foods, flavors, and tastes over others.  I don’t like Lima beans and some people (I have no idea why) like Lima beans.  The answer is to do something that will make me eat the lima beans.

The answer lies by doing something akin to what our mothers did with us when we were kids and picky eaters.  Robin and I have just modified the details so that it will work with your dogs.  Please take a look at our dog training blog titled “What Can I Do If My Dog Doesn’t Eat His Food”.

Tricks to have your dog eat their dog food

How Do I Train My Puppy to Follow Me Around the House?

Puppies are a wonderful addition to the family.  They are cute, cuddly, and always playful.  They are always excited to see us and always want to be in our laps or wanting us to play with them.  This is the normal state of affairs with puppies because of their natural need for companionship and the want to belong to a group.

The one thing that we have to understand is that we were not our puppy’s “first family”.  His first family was made up of a doggie Mommy and doggie brothers and sisters.  The environment may have been different than the one we are currently offering them.

Where most puppies want to follow us around because close proximity to us reinforces their need for safety and belonging, that is not always the case.  Every puppy is different and their perception of their placement into the world can be different.  They may not want to follow us around.  They may feel safer and happier by “just staying put” in a location of their choosing.

It is important that you build up the bond between you and your puppy so that they feel safe, secure, and part of “the group”.  This is the same feeling that they felt from birth with “their first family”.  This is very important and the subject of many other of my dog training articles.  What I want to discuss today is teaching (encouraging) your puppy to follow you around.

Training can always be compartmentalized into specific categories.  The “teaching to do something” falls into the obedience category and is based  on specific “learning modules”. You need to teach your puppy a set of obedience commands that will have the end result of his following you around.

Robin and I have a great dog training article that goes over all of this. Please take a look at our article titled “How Do I Train My Puppy to Follow Me Around the House”.

Puppy with You

What Do I Do with a Food Aggressive Dog?

Food aggression is often a difficult problem to spot in our dogs.  The reason for this is that most people only have one dog.  They normally put the food down in a far part of the room, another room, or even outside.

When their dog eats alone, there their dog doesn’t feel threatened and they aren’t watching their dog for any tell-tale signs.  This “lack of negative occurrence” allows us to let our guards down and never even think about the possibility of food aggression with our dog.

Our problem is that “the real world” is not static.  Sometimes we move the location where we feed our dog.  We may get another dog or have a family member’s dog over for a play date or to stay for a few days.  The kids may want to go over and give our dog a big hug while he is eating his food. These are all random or rare occurrences that may trigger the aggression.  They are especially dangerous because we have not prepared or even considered that a “bad thing” would happen while our dog is eating.

Food aggression can be caused by things that are going on in our dog’s current life experiences.  These are triggers that are easier for us to spot and address.  Unfortunately, many food aggression issues are caused by prior life experiences.  These negative life experiences may have taken place before we even got our dog.

We need to consider the fact that, even though we haven’t seen it to date, our dog may be food aggressive.  We need to prepare and mitigate situations that may provide unwanted triggers. Robin and I have a great dog training article that explains all of this. Please take a look at our article titled “What Do I Do with a Food Aggressive Dog”.

Food Aggression

What Do I Do When My Dogs Experience Sibling Rivalry?

For all of us who have brothers and sisters, we have experienced and taken part in “Sibling Rivalry”. The actions we undertook were normally childish and self-centered.  We may have locked our sister out of the house or short-sheeted our brother’s bed.  We may have tried to get our brother or sister in trouble with our parents by tattletaling  or offering “little white lies” about things around the house.

In all of these instances, the actions are relatively the same that any person may employ at any time against another.  The difference with “Sibling Rivalry” is that they are always among brothers and sisters with the specific engagement of the parents.  For some reason, we are trying to improve our standing among our siblings through the acceptance of our parents.

The interesting thing is that our dogs can also display Sibling Rivalry.  They can also act out by fighting, stealing, and performing other inappropriate behaviors.  These actions are often against the canine brother or sister but are always performed to create our involvement. This is where the identifying characteristic comes into play.

Our dogs are performing things that they naturally understand will require our involvement.  They are testing us to see how we react to the situation between them and their siblings.  What we do in that situation has the ability to significantly determine the pecking order within “the siblings”.  Robin and I have a great behavioral training process that helps remove the possible physical dangers caused by our dogs’ inappropriate actions and reestablishes us as the strong leaders of the group. Please take a moment to review our dog training article titled ” What Do I Do When My Dogs Experience Sibling Rivalry”.

Sibling Rivalry

What Should I Know About My Dog and Poisons?

We love our dogs and the quality of life we can enjoy when we have happy and healthy dogs as part of our family.  We go out of our way to spend time with them, often more time than we normally spend with our“human” family members.

We research the best and most nutritious food for them and make sure that they are always taken to the Vet for their shots and check-ups. We protect our dogs when they are out and about with us and personally take afront the moment anyone says anything bad about them.

We do everything we can to assure that they live a wonderful and blessed life.  Many times we will even go without essentials for ourselves to make sure they are safe and healthy.  With all this said, why would we leave that big bowl of guacamole dip on the coffee table after watching the Sunday game?  This stuff could make them very sick, or even worse.

Robin and I are constantly teaching (preaching to) our clients that they must always be looking at the world through their dog’s eyes and understand the environment around them to keep their dogs safe and healthy.  We just finished watching the game, had a lot of good food (including the nachos that we covered with guacamole), and our favorite team won the big game.  All is well in our universe.

When we got up from the sofa, we thought to ourselves, “I’ll clean up a little later”.  No big deal, all will be fine; in our universe.  We forget that guacamole can be poisonous to dogs and ours may just lick the bowl if we leave it within his reach.

We forget that there are good things in our world that can be bad things in our dog’s world.  We forget because we may not know, or we were just too distracted with some other human matter.  As loving and responsible dog owners, it is our responsibility to protect our dogs.  We must always be aware of what is safe and harmful in the environment we share with them.

The ingestion of poisons, other harmful chemicals, and some plants are major reasons for our dogs’ sicknesses and deaths.  We need to identify these items and the warning signs of our dogs’ consumption of them.  Robin and I have a great dog safety article that explains all of this.  Please read our dog training article titled “What Should I Know About My Dog and Poisons”.

Dog Poisons