Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

Why is it Important That I Train My Dog?

Can you remember the best class you ever took and the best teacher you ever had? It might take a moment, but you will probably remember the teacher but probably might not remember the class.

Although we now live in an on-line world where you never have to see your teacher or participate in a real classroom to learn, I still feel that the human interaction, ability to observe, and create relationships is just as important in the learning experience as the facts that we learn.

Maybe this is because we are all social animals and need that one-on-one connection, trust, and sense of commitment to feel comfortable in expanding out in the world to unknown things.

Our dogs are social animals as are we.  We need to ask ourselves if they may need a proper relationship with their teacher in order to learn.  Can that relationship, if needed, be transferred between one to another?  These are all interesting questions.

Robin and I have a great blog article that tries to answer these questions regarding the need tor a proper relationship to foster successful training and obedience.  Please take a moment to check out our article titled “Why is it Important That I Train My Dog”.

The importance of training your dog

How Do I Stop My Dog from Stealing Food from The Table?

It is amazing how well behaved our dog may be when we are putting food out at the dining room table.  He is nice and calm, and we think everything is great.  Then we need to leave the room for just a second to get something.  We return to missing food.

Dogs stealing food from the table is normally a bigger problem with larger dogs because they can actually get to the food on the table.  That is where the problem actually begins.  When we set the scene to allow them to get the food, several scenarios have the ability to take place.

Depending on the actions that immediately follow our placement of the food on the table, different signals are sent to our dog, and different responses will be required by us.  The bottom line of our immediate actions stems from our dog’s reliance on us as their care giver, leader, and protector.  We are the boss and they should not take stuff off the boss’s desk.  As the boss, we also dole out their pay (or food).

The problem arises depending how our dog interprets our actions regarding the food.  Is it our food or are we giving it to them?  These are all based on actions that “set the scene” and the relationship that we have previously built up with our dog.

So, it all comes down to making sure our dog does not take food that is not his.  We have the ability to successfully establish this rule if we remember some simple canine principles. (The funny point here is that these principles closely resemble “office politics”.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that helps you through this problem. Please check out our blog titled “How Do I Stop My Dog from Stealing Food from The Table”.

Do not let your dog steal food from the table

 

 

What Do I Do When My Dog Needs Medicine and We Are Going on a Trip?

Robin and I have always had a gaggle of dogs and over the last twenty years they have always been on all of our trips.  With so many dogs, it should be pretty obvious that we don’t do a lot of flying.  We always pile them in the car and off we go.  When we are driving down the street or on the interstate, it looks like National Lampoon’s Summer Vacation, except the back of the car is filled with dogs of all sizes.

We try to plan our trips as best as we can, making sure that all our stops are “dog friendly”, our destination has places that our dogs can run and have a good time, and that our activities will coincide with our dogs’ temperaments.

The problem is “life happens” and one or more of our dogs may come down with something, sprain something, or a host of other medical things that just happen to dogs.  Even after the visit to the Vet Hospital, there may be medicines, ointments, or other “medical things” that we will have to perform on our dog.

This normally does not pose a problem because if anything unusual or unplanned happens because of the medicine or procedures we are performing on our dog, we can always go right back to the Vet and work on a “Plan B”.  It is really hard to implement a “Plan B” when you are on the middle of the interstate or a cabin in the woods.

We need to take extra steps to assure that our “Marcus Welby activities” (Google it…) while on the road provide the results we expect.  Robin and I have a great article that can help. Please take a look at our new blog titled “What Do I Do When My Dog Needs Medicine and We Are Going on a Trip”.

What to do about medications for your dog on a trip

How Do I Keep My Dog Safe on Halloween?

Believe it or not, Halloween is the most popular holiday of the year.  It is even more popular than Christmas.  People go crazy and do wild things on this day.  There are so many people in strange costumes, scary sights and sounds put up all over the neighborhood and city that were never there the other 364 days of the year.

There is a constant flow of strangers coming to your door. Some of these strangers seem to jump, scream, and even leap at you when you open the door.  Even it you look through the windows, there are shadows and sights that you have never seen before.  Everything has changed instantly.

Welcome to the holiday and ritual of Halloween.  If you can recall, our parents prepared us for this when we were very small children.  They introduced things slowly, explained what was happening, showed us that it was all just for fun, and gave us CANDY.

How did you prepare your dog for Halloween?  Just as I thought…

You need to prepare your dog for all the unique experiences he will experience when ghosts and goblins come to your door, strange sights appear at the window, or you are taking a walk during trick or treat.  You must show him that you are still in charge and that this is “just another day”.

Robin and I have compiled some simple tips for Halloween in our new Dog Training Blog Article titled “How Do I Keep My Dog Safe on Halloween”. Please take a look so that everyone, including your dog, can enjoy the holiday.

Steps you need to heek your dog safe on Halloween

How Do I Safely Pick Up My Dog?

We often pick up our dogs for many reasons.  The most common reason is that we just want to pick them up because we want to hold, nurture, and play with them.  These are all great intentions and fit in perfectly with the “bond/respect/safety” relationship that our dog expects and requires from us. The problem arises when our actions don’t fall in line with our “great intentions”.

First of all, we have to remember that the dogs we are normally picking up are smaller dogs.  We don’t normally pick up our seventy-pound German Shepard or our hundred and fifty pound Great Dane.  The dogs that are normally picked up are the small and toy breeds.  These dogs are the Toy Poodles, Pugs, French Bulldogs, Yorkies, etc.  Although they are small, they are always very active around us with normally very little fear of anything we may do together.

Now comes the point that I always like to make.  What we are forgetting in our actions with our dogs is the extension of seeing the world through their eyes.  What are they feeling and seeing as we are interacting with them?  Many times, I like to demonstrate these things to my clients as we are at our first training.  Even though we are the same size and I am telling them what I am about to do, I always say “Now, don’t be scared…”.

When you get into close quarters with anyone, including our pets, things can get dicey. Quick movements are magnified when you are right next to your dog.  The boundary between “hold and hurt” can be very dubious when your dog is only five pounds. A quick wiggle can result in a long drop.  When holding your dog, you have moved their natural behavior of fight or flight.

These are a lot of things to think about and a lot of things that can instantly go wrong.  It is important to be proactive in mitigating these possibilities so you can do the simple task of picking up your dog and have it a happy and safe experience.  Robin and I have a great article that can quickly help resolve this issue. Please take a look at our dog training blog article titled “How Do I Safely Pick Up My Dog”.

Steps you need to take to safely pick up your dog

How Do I Teach My Dog to Behave on the Elevator?

Being in a cramped space with strangers with no easy way to get out can be a very scary thing for a lot of people.  We can get nervous, have anxiety fits, and even get physical because of “fear of elevators”  As “people”, we, at least understand what an elevator is and that we will have the opportunity to get off and feel safe again.

Now, let’s turn to our dogs.  They understand walks, pools, stairs, houses, rooms, and other fixed objects that contain noises and senses that they can normally understand.  For example; if they are in a room and hear a noise from the next room, they can easily investigate.  If they feel unsafe in a particular situation, our dogs can use their fight or flight mechanism to return them to their concept of safety.

From an initial, first take; the elevator might seem like a “small room” the first time we take our dog into one.  Then, all of a sudden, they feel the sensation of moving and there are all sorts of strange noises coming from all around them.

Because of our need to “keep our dogs safe”, we have our dog on a tight leash off to one side.  We think that this will keep them safe and won’t permit them to bite or jump on anyone.  We know that we have to do this.  Well, we have just taken our dog’s ability to investigate and safety choice of “flight” off their plate.

As you can see, we are building a larger and larger conundrum.  We need to use the elevator if we live in a high-rise building.  Everything we think we need to do to keep our dog and neighbors safe is really doing the opposite.

We need to figure out a completely different set of training exercises that can fit both our dogs’ needs and the needs of our neighbors. If we don’t do this, high-rise living will be imp[possible. Robin and I have a great dog training article that will solve your problem. Please read “How Do I Teach My Dog to Behave on the Elevator”.

Steps you need to take to keep your dog safe in the elevator

Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

Why is it Important That I Train My Dog?

Can you remember the best class you ever took and the best teacher you ever had? It might take a moment, but you will probably remember the teacher but probably might not remember the class.

Although we now live in an on-line world where you never have to see your teacher or participate in a real classroom to learn, I still feel that the human interaction, ability to observe, and create relationships is just as important in the learning experience as the facts that we learn.

Maybe this is because we are all social animals and need that one-on-one connection, trust, and sense of commitment to feel comfortable in expanding out in the world to unknown things.

Our dogs are social animals as are we.  We need to ask ourselves if they may need a proper relationship with their teacher in order to learn.  Can that relationship, if needed, be transferred between one to another?  These are all interesting questions.

Robin and I have a great blog article that tries to answer these questions regarding the need tor a proper relationship to foster successful training and obedience.  Please take a moment to check out our article titled “Why is it Important That I Train My Dog”.

The importance of training your dog

How Do I Stop My Dog from Stealing Food from The Table?

It is amazing how well behaved our dog may be when we are putting food out at the dining room table.  He is nice and calm, and we think everything is great.  Then we need to leave the room for just a second to get something.  We return to missing food.

Dogs stealing food from the table is normally a bigger problem with larger dogs because they can actually get to the food on the table.  That is where the problem actually begins.  When we set the scene to allow them to get the food, several scenarios have the ability to take place.

Depending on the actions that immediately follow our placement of the food on the table, different signals are sent to our dog, and different responses will be required by us.  The bottom line of our immediate actions stems from our dog’s reliance on us as their care giver, leader, and protector.  We are the boss and they should not take stuff off the boss’s desk.  As the boss, we also dole out their pay (or food).

The problem arises depending how our dog interprets our actions regarding the food.  Is it our food or are we giving it to them?  These are all based on actions that “set the scene” and the relationship that we have previously built up with our dog.

So, it all comes down to making sure our dog does not take food that is not his.  We have the ability to successfully establish this rule if we remember some simple canine principles. (The funny point here is that these principles closely resemble “office politics”.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that helps you through this problem. Please check out our blog titled “How Do I Stop My Dog from Stealing Food from The Table”.

Do not let your dog steal food from the table

 

 

What Do I Do When My Dog Needs Medicine and We Are Going on a Trip?

Robin and I have always had a gaggle of dogs and over the last twenty years they have always been on all of our trips.  With so many dogs, it should be pretty obvious that we don’t do a lot of flying.  We always pile them in the car and off we go.  When we are driving down the street or on the interstate, it looks like National Lampoon’s Summer Vacation, except the back of the car is filled with dogs of all sizes.

We try to plan our trips as best as we can, making sure that all our stops are “dog friendly”, our destination has places that our dogs can run and have a good time, and that our activities will coincide with our dogs’ temperaments.

The problem is “life happens” and one or more of our dogs may come down with something, sprain something, or a host of other medical things that just happen to dogs.  Even after the visit to the Vet Hospital, there may be medicines, ointments, or other “medical things” that we will have to perform on our dog.

This normally does not pose a problem because if anything unusual or unplanned happens because of the medicine or procedures we are performing on our dog, we can always go right back to the Vet and work on a “Plan B”.  It is really hard to implement a “Plan B” when you are on the middle of the interstate or a cabin in the woods.

We need to take extra steps to assure that our “Marcus Welby activities” (Google it…) while on the road provide the results we expect.  Robin and I have a great article that can help. Please take a look at our new blog titled “What Do I Do When My Dog Needs Medicine and We Are Going on a Trip”.

What to do about medications for your dog on a trip

How Do I Keep My Dog Safe on Halloween?

Believe it or not, Halloween is the most popular holiday of the year.  It is even more popular than Christmas.  People go crazy and do wild things on this day.  There are so many people in strange costumes, scary sights and sounds put up all over the neighborhood and city that were never there the other 364 days of the year.

There is a constant flow of strangers coming to your door. Some of these strangers seem to jump, scream, and even leap at you when you open the door.  Even it you look through the windows, there are shadows and sights that you have never seen before.  Everything has changed instantly.

Welcome to the holiday and ritual of Halloween.  If you can recall, our parents prepared us for this when we were very small children.  They introduced things slowly, explained what was happening, showed us that it was all just for fun, and gave us CANDY.

How did you prepare your dog for Halloween?  Just as I thought…

You need to prepare your dog for all the unique experiences he will experience when ghosts and goblins come to your door, strange sights appear at the window, or you are taking a walk during trick or treat.  You must show him that you are still in charge and that this is “just another day”.

Robin and I have compiled some simple tips for Halloween in our new Dog Training Blog Article titled “How Do I Keep My Dog Safe on Halloween”. Please take a look so that everyone, including your dog, can enjoy the holiday.

Steps you need to heek your dog safe on Halloween

How Do I Safely Pick Up My Dog?

We often pick up our dogs for many reasons.  The most common reason is that we just want to pick them up because we want to hold, nurture, and play with them.  These are all great intentions and fit in perfectly with the “bond/respect/safety” relationship that our dog expects and requires from us. The problem arises when our actions don’t fall in line with our “great intentions”.

First of all, we have to remember that the dogs we are normally picking up are smaller dogs.  We don’t normally pick up our seventy-pound German Shepard or our hundred and fifty pound Great Dane.  The dogs that are normally picked up are the small and toy breeds.  These dogs are the Toy Poodles, Pugs, French Bulldogs, Yorkies, etc.  Although they are small, they are always very active around us with normally very little fear of anything we may do together.

Now comes the point that I always like to make.  What we are forgetting in our actions with our dogs is the extension of seeing the world through their eyes.  What are they feeling and seeing as we are interacting with them?  Many times, I like to demonstrate these things to my clients as we are at our first training.  Even though we are the same size and I am telling them what I am about to do, I always say “Now, don’t be scared…”.

When you get into close quarters with anyone, including our pets, things can get dicey. Quick movements are magnified when you are right next to your dog.  The boundary between “hold and hurt” can be very dubious when your dog is only five pounds. A quick wiggle can result in a long drop.  When holding your dog, you have moved their natural behavior of fight or flight.

These are a lot of things to think about and a lot of things that can instantly go wrong.  It is important to be proactive in mitigating these possibilities so you can do the simple task of picking up your dog and have it a happy and safe experience.  Robin and I have a great article that can quickly help resolve this issue. Please take a look at our dog training blog article titled “How Do I Safely Pick Up My Dog”.

Steps you need to take to safely pick up your dog

How Do I Teach My Dog to Behave on the Elevator?

Being in a cramped space with strangers with no easy way to get out can be a very scary thing for a lot of people.  We can get nervous, have anxiety fits, and even get physical because of “fear of elevators”  As “people”, we, at least understand what an elevator is and that we will have the opportunity to get off and feel safe again.

Now, let’s turn to our dogs.  They understand walks, pools, stairs, houses, rooms, and other fixed objects that contain noises and senses that they can normally understand.  For example; if they are in a room and hear a noise from the next room, they can easily investigate.  If they feel unsafe in a particular situation, our dogs can use their fight or flight mechanism to return them to their concept of safety.

From an initial, first take; the elevator might seem like a “small room” the first time we take our dog into one.  Then, all of a sudden, they feel the sensation of moving and there are all sorts of strange noises coming from all around them.

Because of our need to “keep our dogs safe”, we have our dog on a tight leash off to one side.  We think that this will keep them safe and won’t permit them to bite or jump on anyone.  We know that we have to do this.  Well, we have just taken our dog’s ability to investigate and safety choice of “flight” off their plate.

As you can see, we are building a larger and larger conundrum.  We need to use the elevator if we live in a high-rise building.  Everything we think we need to do to keep our dog and neighbors safe is really doing the opposite.

We need to figure out a completely different set of training exercises that can fit both our dogs’ needs and the needs of our neighbors. If we don’t do this, high-rise living will be imp[possible. Robin and I have a great dog training article that will solve your problem. Please read “How Do I Teach My Dog to Behave on the Elevator”.

Steps you need to take to keep your dog safe in the elevator