Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

How Do I Walk My Dog in a Crowded Place?

We all love to walk our dogs and often take them for walks around the neighborhood.  Most of the time, the neighborhood is relatively quiet, and the sights and sounds are familiar and safe for both you and your dog.  Your dog seems to be happy and you can easily get his focus if you want him to do something.

Something very different can happen if you decide to take your dog to a public, crowded place.  You have now introduced an environment where there can be very strange, loud sounds, unfamiliar people and dogs, and possible close-quarter actions.  All of these things could, naturally, make your dog uneasy.

“Uneasy” is really a very minimal way to describe what is probably going through your dog’s head.  He is thrown into a completely foreign environment with unknown sights and sounds and actions that can easily be taken as hostile.  Walking or being calm is now the lowest on his list of things to do.

You need to socialize and properly train your dog in such a way that he will no longer be fearful in such a situation.  Although you can never take into account every “life situation”, you can set the scene to that he will understand that he is safe.

Robin and I have a great dog training article that will easily teach you what you need to do.  Please check out our dog training blog and our article titled “How Do I Walk My Dog in a Crowded Place”.

You must prepare your dog to understand that he is safe with you in public

How Can I Keep My Dog from Going Nuts Before the Walk Even Starts?

We all love to walk our dogs and find it really enjoyable to share a warm summer afternoon with our dog in our neighborhood.  This assumes that our dog isn’t going nuts, pulling us down the street, and barking at everything that moves.  This does not make a wonderful experience and makes most of our neighbors hate it when they see us coming down the street with our dog.

We try to correct our dog while we are walking, but they don’t pay attention and seem to pull and bark even more.  We get mad at our dog and become embarrassed because all our neighbors are now giving us “the stare”.  All we can do is to turn around and head home as quickly as possible.

Well, that was a big waste of time.  Even worse, our dog is now all charged up and running around our house still driving us nuts and knocking things to the ground.  Nothing we do seems to work, and it all started when we began to get ready for the walk.

The answer to this problem does not lay in correction while on the walk, but way before that.  We need to understand how to take control of the situation before we even open the door to go outside.  It must come from proper focus and command direction.

Robin and I have a great dog training article that provides information that has helped many of our clients suffering this dilemma. Please take a moment to read our dog training article titled “How Can I Keep My Dog from Going Nuts Before the Walk Even Starts”.

Start your dog walk off correctly if you want to have an enjoyable experience walking your dog

Should the Entire Family Participate in Training Our Dog? 

Robin and I often run into the situation where one member of a family really wants a dog and most of the other family members either don’t like dogs or really just don’t want to get involved with the “dog training process”.

When you get a dog, you are adding a family member.  As a family member, your dog believes that there are rules and actions that he and everyone else will obey and follow.  This is a natural instinct because his concept of “family” originates in the canine pack relationship.  All the pack members have the same roles and responsibilities that they must follow in order to keep the pack and all the pack members safe.

Dog training is as much relationship building as it is “come, sit, stay”. In order to build a proper relationship, there must be interaction.  In your dog’s mind, interactions must follow a specific process that is strengthened and confirmed over time.

When there is only one human “in class” with your dog, that relationship can not be established with the “missing students”.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that can resolve this problem titled “Should the Entire Family Participate in Training Our Dog”.

Dog training is a family affair and the entire family should work to train your dog

How Can I Build a Bond with My Dog with Long Work Hours?

Robin and I have seen this over and over again.  We have a client that loves dogs and has the best intentions on being the best dog owner in the world.  They get a dog and think that everything is going to be great.

Then, they “start to do the math” with their free time.  They have to go to work because their boss will fire them if they don’t.  They have responsibilities with their friends, family, and community that consume most of the remaining “I am not asleep” time from their lives.

Now they finally arrive home and are greeted by that furry, naked family member that only wants to give them love and happiness and only asks for the same in return.  Our client is tired and late and is now in a conundrum.

You might go outside for five minutes to throw the ball or have them sit with you while you watch the news.  You are probably still on your cell phone about work while you are tossing the ball and trying to eat dinner as you are watching TV.  Although your may be “with your dog”; you are not building up the quality bond that is critical in your lasting relationship with your dog.

What to do, what to do, what to do!  Robin and I can’t magically create a twenty-five-hour day for you, but we do have some great dog training and socialization tips that will help you balance the insanity of modern life and the needs of you and your dog.  Please take a moment out of your crazy day to check out our dog training article titled “How Can I Build a Bond with My Dog with Long Work Hours”.

Learn how to bond with your dog when you have a very busy schedule

What Are Some Tips to Help with My Dog’s Separation Anxiety?

One of the most difficult behaviors to address in dog training is Separation Anxiety.  This is because your dog will display this behavior when you are not present.  The root cause of this behavior are unfortunate situations your dog has experienced in the past; often before you even owned your dog.

Even though this is one of the most difficult dog behaviors to correct, it is still one that you can completely resolve.  Since you will probably never know the underlying cause of the separation anxiety, you should not try and guess the cause and blindly train on pure hypothesis.

The best way to address your dog’s separation anxiety is to focus on the current actions that are causing the inappropriate behavior.  The biggest action is the fact that you are there one moment and gone the next.  You need to break this action into a long list of smaller and shorter moments that create a timeline of the happy time when you are there with your dog and the sad time when your dog is there all by himself.

Robin and I have a great article titled “What Are Some Tips to Help with My Dog’s Separation Anxiety” that starts to break the process down for you.  Resolving separation anxiety is attainable, it just requires patience, repetition, consistency, and a little bit of hard work.

Learn some of the dog training steps ro resolve your dog's separation anxiety

Should I Allow My Dog to Sometimes be Crazy Inside the House?

As we have discussed many times in the past, you are the boss and you can decide what you want your dog to do and not do.  Bring the boss can be a lot of fun because that means you can decide whatever you want to do and what you want other people and your dog to do.

Being the boss also comes with a great deal of responsibility.  When you allow yourself or the people and dogs around you to do or not do things, the results are your responsibility.  With this said, the rules that you are making are very important and need to be established in an appropriate way.

You may still think that this is not that big a deal, but you may be missing the point.  Most people have a lot of experience in setting rules, boundaries, and guidelines for other humans.  As humans, we are also very well equipped in understanding what to do when rules are imposed on us.

The issue that we must face is that our dog does not understand rules in the same way as us.  This dichotomy when it comes to rules versus actions causes confusion and sometimes angst between us and our best furry friend.

Robin and I have a great article that explains this dichotomy and will help you answer the question “Should I Allow My Dog to Sometimes be Crazy Inside the House?”  To give you a hint, it all revolves around one word in the question I just asked.  Good Reading!

Should you allow your dog to be nuts inside

Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

How Do I Walk My Dog in a Crowded Place?

We all love to walk our dogs and often take them for walks around the neighborhood.  Most of the time, the neighborhood is relatively quiet, and the sights and sounds are familiar and safe for both you and your dog.  Your dog seems to be happy and you can easily get his focus if you want him to do something.

Something very different can happen if you decide to take your dog to a public, crowded place.  You have now introduced an environment where there can be very strange, loud sounds, unfamiliar people and dogs, and possible close-quarter actions.  All of these things could, naturally, make your dog uneasy.

“Uneasy” is really a very minimal way to describe what is probably going through your dog’s head.  He is thrown into a completely foreign environment with unknown sights and sounds and actions that can easily be taken as hostile.  Walking or being calm is now the lowest on his list of things to do.

You need to socialize and properly train your dog in such a way that he will no longer be fearful in such a situation.  Although you can never take into account every “life situation”, you can set the scene to that he will understand that he is safe.

Robin and I have a great dog training article that will easily teach you what you need to do.  Please check out our dog training blog and our article titled “How Do I Walk My Dog in a Crowded Place”.

You must prepare your dog to understand that he is safe with you in public

How Can I Keep My Dog from Going Nuts Before the Walk Even Starts?

We all love to walk our dogs and find it really enjoyable to share a warm summer afternoon with our dog in our neighborhood.  This assumes that our dog isn’t going nuts, pulling us down the street, and barking at everything that moves.  This does not make a wonderful experience and makes most of our neighbors hate it when they see us coming down the street with our dog.

We try to correct our dog while we are walking, but they don’t pay attention and seem to pull and bark even more.  We get mad at our dog and become embarrassed because all our neighbors are now giving us “the stare”.  All we can do is to turn around and head home as quickly as possible.

Well, that was a big waste of time.  Even worse, our dog is now all charged up and running around our house still driving us nuts and knocking things to the ground.  Nothing we do seems to work, and it all started when we began to get ready for the walk.

The answer to this problem does not lay in correction while on the walk, but way before that.  We need to understand how to take control of the situation before we even open the door to go outside.  It must come from proper focus and command direction.

Robin and I have a great dog training article that provides information that has helped many of our clients suffering this dilemma. Please take a moment to read our dog training article titled “How Can I Keep My Dog from Going Nuts Before the Walk Even Starts”.

Start your dog walk off correctly if you want to have an enjoyable experience walking your dog

Should the Entire Family Participate in Training Our Dog? 

Robin and I often run into the situation where one member of a family really wants a dog and most of the other family members either don’t like dogs or really just don’t want to get involved with the “dog training process”.

When you get a dog, you are adding a family member.  As a family member, your dog believes that there are rules and actions that he and everyone else will obey and follow.  This is a natural instinct because his concept of “family” originates in the canine pack relationship.  All the pack members have the same roles and responsibilities that they must follow in order to keep the pack and all the pack members safe.

Dog training is as much relationship building as it is “come, sit, stay”. In order to build a proper relationship, there must be interaction.  In your dog’s mind, interactions must follow a specific process that is strengthened and confirmed over time.

When there is only one human “in class” with your dog, that relationship can not be established with the “missing students”.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that can resolve this problem titled “Should the Entire Family Participate in Training Our Dog”.

Dog training is a family affair and the entire family should work to train your dog

How Can I Build a Bond with My Dog with Long Work Hours?

Robin and I have seen this over and over again.  We have a client that loves dogs and has the best intentions on being the best dog owner in the world.  They get a dog and think that everything is going to be great.

Then, they “start to do the math” with their free time.  They have to go to work because their boss will fire them if they don’t.  They have responsibilities with their friends, family, and community that consume most of the remaining “I am not asleep” time from their lives.

Now they finally arrive home and are greeted by that furry, naked family member that only wants to give them love and happiness and only asks for the same in return.  Our client is tired and late and is now in a conundrum.

You might go outside for five minutes to throw the ball or have them sit with you while you watch the news.  You are probably still on your cell phone about work while you are tossing the ball and trying to eat dinner as you are watching TV.  Although your may be “with your dog”; you are not building up the quality bond that is critical in your lasting relationship with your dog.

What to do, what to do, what to do!  Robin and I can’t magically create a twenty-five-hour day for you, but we do have some great dog training and socialization tips that will help you balance the insanity of modern life and the needs of you and your dog.  Please take a moment out of your crazy day to check out our dog training article titled “How Can I Build a Bond with My Dog with Long Work Hours”.

Learn how to bond with your dog when you have a very busy schedule

What Are Some Tips to Help with My Dog’s Separation Anxiety?

One of the most difficult behaviors to address in dog training is Separation Anxiety.  This is because your dog will display this behavior when you are not present.  The root cause of this behavior are unfortunate situations your dog has experienced in the past; often before you even owned your dog.

Even though this is one of the most difficult dog behaviors to correct, it is still one that you can completely resolve.  Since you will probably never know the underlying cause of the separation anxiety, you should not try and guess the cause and blindly train on pure hypothesis.

The best way to address your dog’s separation anxiety is to focus on the current actions that are causing the inappropriate behavior.  The biggest action is the fact that you are there one moment and gone the next.  You need to break this action into a long list of smaller and shorter moments that create a timeline of the happy time when you are there with your dog and the sad time when your dog is there all by himself.

Robin and I have a great article titled “What Are Some Tips to Help with My Dog’s Separation Anxiety” that starts to break the process down for you.  Resolving separation anxiety is attainable, it just requires patience, repetition, consistency, and a little bit of hard work.

Learn some of the dog training steps ro resolve your dog's separation anxiety

Should I Allow My Dog to Sometimes be Crazy Inside the House?

As we have discussed many times in the past, you are the boss and you can decide what you want your dog to do and not do.  Bring the boss can be a lot of fun because that means you can decide whatever you want to do and what you want other people and your dog to do.

Being the boss also comes with a great deal of responsibility.  When you allow yourself or the people and dogs around you to do or not do things, the results are your responsibility.  With this said, the rules that you are making are very important and need to be established in an appropriate way.

You may still think that this is not that big a deal, but you may be missing the point.  Most people have a lot of experience in setting rules, boundaries, and guidelines for other humans.  As humans, we are also very well equipped in understanding what to do when rules are imposed on us.

The issue that we must face is that our dog does not understand rules in the same way as us.  This dichotomy when it comes to rules versus actions causes confusion and sometimes angst between us and our best furry friend.

Robin and I have a great article that explains this dichotomy and will help you answer the question “Should I Allow My Dog to Sometimes be Crazy Inside the House?”  To give you a hint, it all revolves around one word in the question I just asked.  Good Reading!

Should you allow your dog to be nuts inside