Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

How Do I Avoid Being Bitten by a Dog?

How Do I Avoid Being Bitten by a Dog?

Most of us, at one time or another, have been bitten by a dog, chased by a dog, or have had a dog challenge and scare us.  No matter what the case, it was never a great experience.  These events often lead us to be afraid of the dog that scared us, or in some cases, scared of all dogs.

Dogs are great creatures.  In my opinion, they have been put on this earth to make our lives a little better.  Life can often be so cruel and unfair.  Coming home at night to a big lick, complete attention, and unquestioning love can be a wonderful solution to a really bad day.

When we are afraid of dogs, we can never experience the unquestioning and nonjudgmental affection our dogs provide.  But how can we not be afraid of dogs when there are times where they may be aggressive towards us?

The answer lies in our understanding of how dogs think and what we need to do when inappropriate confrontations occur.  When a seventy pound, four legged, adrenalized, strange dog is approaching us, we naturally react in fear, or aggression.  We are basing our actions on assumptions and not understanding.

We see a strange dog running at us and always think the worse.  We assume that the dog is going to bite us.  We take steps that we believe will protect ourselves when, in reality, they are making matters worse.  In situations such as this, we often confirm that we will be bitten instead of deescalating and redirecting.

Robin and I have an excellent article that explains what you have to do. Please take a moment to read our dog training article titled “How Do I Avoid Being Bitten by a Dog”.

How to avoid dog bites

What Should I Feed My Dog?

What Should I Feed My Dog?

As parents, we always want to feed out children healthy and nutritious meals.  This can be really hard because most things that our kids love and taste good to them always seem to be unhealthy and won’t necessarily deliver the nutrients they need to grow and stay healthy.

That is why we (hopefully) aren’t constantly stopping at Taco Bell or McDonalds to pick up their meals.  We know that we need to feed them healthy food and we also know that this is not easy.  Why eat lima beans when you want a happy meal?  We know that our hard work of making them eat well will pay off in having our kids grow up to be healthy and happy.

Serving good food is hard work but will create great, long term results.  This is our job as our kids’ parents.  But, what about our dogs?

Just as our kids are animals (sometimes more that we would like); our dogs are also animals.  Our dogs need to eat and process food just as our kids.  If we understand that our kids need healthy meals to thrive, why would we think any differently when it comes to our dogs?

Well, of course our dogs need healthy food.  We love our dogs and would only want to give them meals that will allow them to be happy and live a long and wonderful life.

The problem now arises because we “assume” that we are providing our dogs a healthy diet.  The commercial on TV said that the food was excellent.  The picture on the front of the bag looked really nice.  That was the food you  had always fed your dog.

The truth is that many of us have no idea what good dog food really is.  Although “canine nutrition” is a complicated subject, Robin and I have written a great article that provides some simple guidelines when coming to picking a healthy food for your dog. Please take a look at our article titled “What Should I Feed My Dog?”

Learn what to feed your dog

How Do I Stop My Dog Stealing Food?

How Do I Stop My Dog Stealing Food?

When our dog takes salami, roast beef, provolone cheese, and fresh bread that we had laid out to make a subway sandwich from the kitchen counter or runs off with the raw steaks that we had next to the grill on the back deck, we are not very happy campers.  Our dog just stole our stuff and we aren’t going to get it back.

Notice that I used the phrase “stole our stuff” because we assume that our dog “knew what he was doing” and understood that it was not his.  If it were “his stuff”, it wouldn’t be stealing and something that would be perfectly acceptable.

Before we get “crazy mad” at our dog for taking the food, we need to determine if what he was doing was really wrong.  We need to understand what he was seeing, feeling, and assuming when he saw the food.  We need to look into the issues regarding whether the food had been left unattended.  We need to determine if we left the food easily accessible in the same manner we may have left his toys for him to enjoy.

One of the major things that we need to recognize is our dog’s understanding of ownership and sharing.  These concepts are slightly different in the canine world and can greatly change the idea that our dog “stole the food”.

Robin and I have a great dog training article that will help you understand if your dog stole the food or if you offered him the food.  There is a big difference.  Please read our dog training blog titled “How Do I Stop My Dog Stealing Food”.

Stop My Dog Stealing Food

How Do I Stop My Dog from Digging?

How Do I Stop My Dog from Digging?

I think we all can agree that having our dog dig up the back yard is an awfully bad habit.  Like all bad habits, some of them are harder to break than others.  It is important for us to discover why this habit started in the first place.  If we do not understand why our dog is doing something, we can never start down the appropriate path of modifying or eliminating that action.

Being dog trainers, Robin and I have “watched many dogs for a very long time”.  If we were asked to list what dogs do, we would normally list things like barking, jumping, walking, coming, playing, chasing, and other natural doggie things.  Although “digging” is never one of the first things that come to mind, it is an action that they do and one that can be very annoying.  We don’t want our manicured back yard to become a mining pit.

As with most bad habits, the underlying causes are often innocent and even benign. Our dog jumps on us when we come home. We hate the fact that he is jumping on us and getting us dirty, but we can’t fault the fact that he loves us and is happy to see us.  Our dog may bark at the front window while we are watching TV and that is annoying us.  We don’t like this, but it is his way of warning us that there is something outside.  We don’t get mad when our doorbell rings or the outside motion detector lights go on at night.

We need to understand why our dog is digging up the back yard.  Only then can we create the appropriate teaching environment that can eliminate or redirect his inappropriate action. Robin and I have a great dog training article that helps you  identify why your dog is digging and the appropriate steps to stop the digging. Please read our dog training article titled “How Do I Stop My Dog from Digging”.

Stop your dog from digging in the back yard

What Do I Do When My Dog is Nervous Riding in the Elevator?

What Do I Do When My Dog is Nervous Riding in the Elevator?

When you come to think about it, being nervous isn’t really a bad thing.  It is a natural and somewhat subconscious process of our body telling us that something may be wrong.  At that specific moment, we may not know what it is, but our body puts us “on warning” to be on the lookout.  When asked “Why are you nervous”, we often can’t provide a definitive answer.  Because of this, we often downplay or even belittle people around us who are nervous.

Our dogs can become nervous too.  Because of our preconceived bias towards that function, we downplay and often try to stop our dogs from having that emotion. We think we can stop our dogs from being nervous because when we are nervous, we just keep repeating in our heads “I feel fine, I feel fine, I feel fine”.

This does not work with our dogs.  They are extremely focused on the environment around them.  They have built up a pattern that specific sights, sounds, and locations can result in specific actions.  We commonly see this in their “fight or flight” reflex.  When they are placed into a specific location, normally confined with single or no exits”, they feel the immediate need to defend or retreat.

Because we often think we can have them “work through it”, we only make “the fight” option available.  This often happens in elevators.

Our dog is either in the enclosed space with the possibility of danger or we are specifically taking him into the enclosed space with the possibility of danger.  Since elevators are a major part of many urban dogs’ lives, we need to resolve this.

Robin and I have a great dog training article that explains how to make the elevator safe for your dog. Please take a moment to read our dog training article titled” What Do I Do When My Dog is Nervous Riding in the Elevator”.

Elevator Rides with your Dog

How Can I Help My Scared and Aggressive Dog?

How Can I Help My Scared and Aggressive Dog?

It is a universal norm that all of us want to feel safe and protected.  This is true for humans and animals alike.  That is why humans started to group into tribes, communities, cities, and countries.  Our dog’s ancestors, the wolves, grouped into packs.  We all remember the old saying, “There is safety in numbers”.  We do what is necessary to feel safe.

As humans, we may lock our doors, keep the light on at night, or not travel down that creepy street.  When we feel safe, we are happy and confident.  So, if we are feeling this way, why are our dogs looking like they are scared and even ready to become aggressive?

Robin and I often look at our clients and say “You are a human. Your dog is a dog. You wear clothes and walk on two legs. Your dog walks around naked on four legs. You are different.”  We tell our clients this more often that you may think.

The truth is that our dogs have different triggers that tell them that they are safe.  Lights and locked doors, although helpful, are not important to them when it comes to their safety.  Where we have come to rely on technology, they still focus on the forces of nature.

How do things feel? What do you see? What do you hear? How is someone standing? What is your nature? Where is the focus?

These are some of the experiences that they include when they determine safety and security.  Before all our “technology stuff” that started to kick in several thousand years ago, these were important to us too.  We need to reimagine what is important to our dogs so we can help them feel safe and no longer scared.

Robin and I have a great dog training article that explains what you can easily do to let your dog no longer be scared and passively aggressive.  Please read our dog training article titled “How Can I Help My Scared and Aggressive Dog”.

Help your scared dog

Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

How Do I Avoid Being Bitten by a Dog?

How Do I Avoid Being Bitten by a Dog?

Most of us, at one time or another, have been bitten by a dog, chased by a dog, or have had a dog challenge and scare us.  No matter what the case, it was never a great experience.  These events often lead us to be afraid of the dog that scared us, or in some cases, scared of all dogs.

Dogs are great creatures.  In my opinion, they have been put on this earth to make our lives a little better.  Life can often be so cruel and unfair.  Coming home at night to a big lick, complete attention, and unquestioning love can be a wonderful solution to a really bad day.

When we are afraid of dogs, we can never experience the unquestioning and nonjudgmental affection our dogs provide.  But how can we not be afraid of dogs when there are times where they may be aggressive towards us?

The answer lies in our understanding of how dogs think and what we need to do when inappropriate confrontations occur.  When a seventy pound, four legged, adrenalized, strange dog is approaching us, we naturally react in fear, or aggression.  We are basing our actions on assumptions and not understanding.

We see a strange dog running at us and always think the worse.  We assume that the dog is going to bite us.  We take steps that we believe will protect ourselves when, in reality, they are making matters worse.  In situations such as this, we often confirm that we will be bitten instead of deescalating and redirecting.

Robin and I have an excellent article that explains what you have to do. Please take a moment to read our dog training article titled “How Do I Avoid Being Bitten by a Dog”.

How to avoid dog bites

What Should I Feed My Dog?

What Should I Feed My Dog?

As parents, we always want to feed out children healthy and nutritious meals.  This can be really hard because most things that our kids love and taste good to them always seem to be unhealthy and won’t necessarily deliver the nutrients they need to grow and stay healthy.

That is why we (hopefully) aren’t constantly stopping at Taco Bell or McDonalds to pick up their meals.  We know that we need to feed them healthy food and we also know that this is not easy.  Why eat lima beans when you want a happy meal?  We know that our hard work of making them eat well will pay off in having our kids grow up to be healthy and happy.

Serving good food is hard work but will create great, long term results.  This is our job as our kids’ parents.  But, what about our dogs?

Just as our kids are animals (sometimes more that we would like); our dogs are also animals.  Our dogs need to eat and process food just as our kids.  If we understand that our kids need healthy meals to thrive, why would we think any differently when it comes to our dogs?

Well, of course our dogs need healthy food.  We love our dogs and would only want to give them meals that will allow them to be happy and live a long and wonderful life.

The problem now arises because we “assume” that we are providing our dogs a healthy diet.  The commercial on TV said that the food was excellent.  The picture on the front of the bag looked really nice.  That was the food you  had always fed your dog.

The truth is that many of us have no idea what good dog food really is.  Although “canine nutrition” is a complicated subject, Robin and I have written a great article that provides some simple guidelines when coming to picking a healthy food for your dog. Please take a look at our article titled “What Should I Feed My Dog?”

Learn what to feed your dog

How Do I Stop My Dog Stealing Food?

How Do I Stop My Dog Stealing Food?

When our dog takes salami, roast beef, provolone cheese, and fresh bread that we had laid out to make a subway sandwich from the kitchen counter or runs off with the raw steaks that we had next to the grill on the back deck, we are not very happy campers.  Our dog just stole our stuff and we aren’t going to get it back.

Notice that I used the phrase “stole our stuff” because we assume that our dog “knew what he was doing” and understood that it was not his.  If it were “his stuff”, it wouldn’t be stealing and something that would be perfectly acceptable.

Before we get “crazy mad” at our dog for taking the food, we need to determine if what he was doing was really wrong.  We need to understand what he was seeing, feeling, and assuming when he saw the food.  We need to look into the issues regarding whether the food had been left unattended.  We need to determine if we left the food easily accessible in the same manner we may have left his toys for him to enjoy.

One of the major things that we need to recognize is our dog’s understanding of ownership and sharing.  These concepts are slightly different in the canine world and can greatly change the idea that our dog “stole the food”.

Robin and I have a great dog training article that will help you understand if your dog stole the food or if you offered him the food.  There is a big difference.  Please read our dog training blog titled “How Do I Stop My Dog Stealing Food”.

Stop My Dog Stealing Food

How Do I Stop My Dog from Digging?

How Do I Stop My Dog from Digging?

I think we all can agree that having our dog dig up the back yard is an awfully bad habit.  Like all bad habits, some of them are harder to break than others.  It is important for us to discover why this habit started in the first place.  If we do not understand why our dog is doing something, we can never start down the appropriate path of modifying or eliminating that action.

Being dog trainers, Robin and I have “watched many dogs for a very long time”.  If we were asked to list what dogs do, we would normally list things like barking, jumping, walking, coming, playing, chasing, and other natural doggie things.  Although “digging” is never one of the first things that come to mind, it is an action that they do and one that can be very annoying.  We don’t want our manicured back yard to become a mining pit.

As with most bad habits, the underlying causes are often innocent and even benign. Our dog jumps on us when we come home. We hate the fact that he is jumping on us and getting us dirty, but we can’t fault the fact that he loves us and is happy to see us.  Our dog may bark at the front window while we are watching TV and that is annoying us.  We don’t like this, but it is his way of warning us that there is something outside.  We don’t get mad when our doorbell rings or the outside motion detector lights go on at night.

We need to understand why our dog is digging up the back yard.  Only then can we create the appropriate teaching environment that can eliminate or redirect his inappropriate action. Robin and I have a great dog training article that helps you  identify why your dog is digging and the appropriate steps to stop the digging. Please read our dog training article titled “How Do I Stop My Dog from Digging”.

Stop your dog from digging in the back yard

What Do I Do When My Dog is Nervous Riding in the Elevator?

What Do I Do When My Dog is Nervous Riding in the Elevator?

When you come to think about it, being nervous isn’t really a bad thing.  It is a natural and somewhat subconscious process of our body telling us that something may be wrong.  At that specific moment, we may not know what it is, but our body puts us “on warning” to be on the lookout.  When asked “Why are you nervous”, we often can’t provide a definitive answer.  Because of this, we often downplay or even belittle people around us who are nervous.

Our dogs can become nervous too.  Because of our preconceived bias towards that function, we downplay and often try to stop our dogs from having that emotion. We think we can stop our dogs from being nervous because when we are nervous, we just keep repeating in our heads “I feel fine, I feel fine, I feel fine”.

This does not work with our dogs.  They are extremely focused on the environment around them.  They have built up a pattern that specific sights, sounds, and locations can result in specific actions.  We commonly see this in their “fight or flight” reflex.  When they are placed into a specific location, normally confined with single or no exits”, they feel the immediate need to defend or retreat.

Because we often think we can have them “work through it”, we only make “the fight” option available.  This often happens in elevators.

Our dog is either in the enclosed space with the possibility of danger or we are specifically taking him into the enclosed space with the possibility of danger.  Since elevators are a major part of many urban dogs’ lives, we need to resolve this.

Robin and I have a great dog training article that explains how to make the elevator safe for your dog. Please take a moment to read our dog training article titled” What Do I Do When My Dog is Nervous Riding in the Elevator”.

Elevator Rides with your Dog

How Can I Help My Scared and Aggressive Dog?

How Can I Help My Scared and Aggressive Dog?

It is a universal norm that all of us want to feel safe and protected.  This is true for humans and animals alike.  That is why humans started to group into tribes, communities, cities, and countries.  Our dog’s ancestors, the wolves, grouped into packs.  We all remember the old saying, “There is safety in numbers”.  We do what is necessary to feel safe.

As humans, we may lock our doors, keep the light on at night, or not travel down that creepy street.  When we feel safe, we are happy and confident.  So, if we are feeling this way, why are our dogs looking like they are scared and even ready to become aggressive?

Robin and I often look at our clients and say “You are a human. Your dog is a dog. You wear clothes and walk on two legs. Your dog walks around naked on four legs. You are different.”  We tell our clients this more often that you may think.

The truth is that our dogs have different triggers that tell them that they are safe.  Lights and locked doors, although helpful, are not important to them when it comes to their safety.  Where we have come to rely on technology, they still focus on the forces of nature.

How do things feel? What do you see? What do you hear? How is someone standing? What is your nature? Where is the focus?

These are some of the experiences that they include when they determine safety and security.  Before all our “technology stuff” that started to kick in several thousand years ago, these were important to us too.  We need to reimagine what is important to our dogs so we can help them feel safe and no longer scared.

Robin and I have a great dog training article that explains what you can easily do to let your dog no longer be scared and passively aggressive.  Please read our dog training article titled “How Can I Help My Scared and Aggressive Dog”.

Help your scared dog