Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

Should I Train My Dog Myself or Send Him to a Board and Train?

Should I Train My Dog Myself or Send Him to a Board and Train?

There is always an ongoing debate if training your dog yourself or sending your dog to a Canine Board and Train facility for a few weeks is the best.  Each seem the same because the “hopeful and assumed” end result of each process is having a well-trained family dog.

We can look at this question in many ways.  The first way is to assume that “if it costs more, it must be better”.  I can guarantee you that Board and Train programs are always far more expensive than in home training. So, Board and Train programs are better, right?

Besides that, my dog is immersed in learning all the right stuff while being directed and guided by a staff of qualified, professional dog trainers.  Day in and day out he is focused on obedience.  When he leaves the Board and Train facility and comes home, he is going to be perfect, right?

In many respects, this could build a strong case for Canine Board and Train Facilities.  Board and Train Facilities and their trainers can easily achieve the proper mechanics of obedience and appropriate behavior for your dog.  What they can not achieve is the continuance of your dog’s good behavior and obedience.

So, what’s missing? If you can’t get that from a Board and Train program, can you get it from an In-Home Training program?  Robin and I have a great blog that will dig down into the core requirements of training your dog.  Please check out our dog training blog titled” Should I Train My Dog Myself or Send Him to a Board and Train”.

Board and Train your dog or have In-Home Dog Training

Should I Take My Dog to a Dog Park?

Should I Take My Dog to a Dog Park?

Dog parks can be great places to let your dog off their leash, run to their heart’s content, and just be a dog.  We have pictures in our heads of all the dogs getting along and playing nicely.  But is that really the case all the time?

If we don’t have a big back yard or there aren’t a lot of neighborhood dogs for play dates, dog parks seem like the obvious choice.  In most instances, most dog owners bring their dogs to the park for those reasons.  The problem lies in the fact that many people bring their dogs to the dog park for other reasons.

Over the years I have often seen many well intended dog owners bring their dogs to the dog park for “not the best reasons”.  One of my favorite “not a great reasons” is that the dog is somewhat fearful of strange dogs and the owner thinks that if he brings his dog to the dog park and let him out with the other dogs, a miracle will occur and everything will be fixed.

Some dog owners bring their dog to the park because the dog needs to “get his energy out”.  Well, that “getting the energy out” comes at the expense of other dogs in the park.

Since dog parks are normally public places, there are very few rules and constraints to it’s use.  That means that you need to “self-police” the situation to assure that you and your dog will be safe in that environment.  This becomes even more critical because your dog will not be on a leash and you will have little control over any situations that start to become problematic.

Don’t worry.  There is a way to prepare for the dog park and manage the situation. Robin and I have a great dog training article that will detail what you need to do. Please take a look at our training article titled “ Should I Take My Dog to a Dog Park”.

Take your dog to tyhe dog park

What Should I Do If a Dog Chases Me on My Bike?

What Should I Do If a Dog Chases Me on My Bike?

Back in my day, and that day is a pretty long time ago, the first indication of your personal freedom was when you got your first bicycle.  That meant you could then go see your friends who lived more than a block or two away.  You could also play longer before dinner because the bike could get you home really, really fast.

Having a bike was great!  We learned about watching out for cars and to be careful when people were walking on the sidewalks and that we should keep both hands on the handlebars.  If we had a ten-speed bike, we also learned (normally the hard way) which break handle to squeeze first so that we could safely stop.

Then, came that fateful day that most of us still remember.  The day when we were happily riding our bicycle to our friend’s house and a neighbor dog comes out from behind their house.  He is running straight for us and barking like we did something wrong.  We had no idea what was going on because we were just riding our bike.  That dog never came after us when we were just walking by.

Well, he gets up to us and starts nipping.  We try and go faster, and he finds more “doggie energy” to go faster too.  We try to turn left and right and he follows barking and trying to nip..

To this day, we really don’t have a great solution for these crazy dogs.  Don’t worry, Robin and I can help.  We have a great dog training article that explains why the dog is chasing us and then gives multiple solutions to keep us safe and “unbitten”.  Please take a moment to check out our dog training article titled “What Should I Do If a Dog Chases Me on My Bike”.

Stop Dogs Chasing You When On a Bike

Why Isn’t My Dog Learning His Lessons?

Why Isn’t My Dog Learning His Lessons?

It is so frustrating when we can’t get our dog to learn commands that we think are so simple he should “naturally know them”.  We see our neighbor dogs behaving so well and responding to all the regular doggie commands like “Come”, “Sit”, “Stay”, and “Walk”.  The only thing that our dog can do is “Don’t Pay Attention to Me”.

It isn’t that our dog can’t learn or doesn’t want to learn.  All dogs want to please us, and they really want to positively respond to our wishes.  Being social animals, they have a natural need to fit in with the rest of the group.  They want to know the rules and norms.  They want to be a part of the group activities. This is all based upon their ability to know what we want them to do.

The problem lies in a break between our commands and their ability to appropriately respond to those commands.  It is centered on what our dog has the ability to currently learn and our ability to teach them the appropriate lesson.  Let me clarify this point by giving an example of when we were in grade school.

Let’s say that we were called to the black board to work a math problem that the teacher had just written.  We go to the board and can only get through part of the problem.  At that point we had failed the problem.  Our teacher now comes over and helps us understand what to do next.  All of a sudden, we can answer the problem!

Our teacher understood where she needed to show and guide (teach) us to allow us to proceed to the correct answer.  This is what many of our clients are lacking in their teaching process.  Robin and I have a great article that walks you through the process by presenting a simple dog training lesson and the teaching steps involved in success.  Please read our article titled “Why Isn’t My Dog Learning His Lessons”.

Training My Dog

What Are Some Great Crate Training Tips?

What Are Some Great Crate Training Tips?

The use of crates has always been a very large point of contention among many dog owners.  Some dog owners swear that crates are great and that their dogs love their crates.  Other dog owners are positive that dog crates are nothing more than jails and horrible places to put their dogs.  They even get mad if you bring up the subject of crates.

So, what is the “real deal”.  Do dog crates get a thumbs up or do they take a thumbs down?  First of all, we need to understand that the crate is nothing more than a tool.  Like any tools, they can be used properly and do good things.  They can be used improperly and do bad things or even break things.

The crate can only be used for positive things.  Anything that can provide a constructive and understandable teaching moment are great uses for crates.  Things like potty training where we can use the crate for consistency and encouraging natural instincts is a great use of the crate.  Using the crate in situations where we will enhance our dog’s feeling of safety and security are also great uses of the dog crate.

The misconception that the crate is “bad” is often developed out of our (human) fear of being contained in a controlled place.  We often call this “jail”.  From a “human point of view”, this would be a natural reaction to the crate.  But, we need to understand that this exercise is based on determining the crate’s relevance from our dog’s point of view.  Dog’s often consider the crate as their den, their happy place, and the safest place on earth.

So, what are some tips that we can share regarding our dog and their dog crate?  Robin and I have some great suggestions that will help you effectively use the crate as a great learning and safety tool.  Please read our dog training article titled “What Are Some Great Crate Training Tips”.

Dog crates are great dog training tools.

Do You Train Guard Dogs?

Do You Train Guard Dogs?

When most people think of a “Guard Dog” they think of a big and scary German Shepherd jumping at the fence with big signs “Beware of Dog”.  These are the dogs you would obviously not want in your living room sitting next to your family or at the door when you are letting your friends in to watch the game.

Most of us believe that “guard dogs” could never be “family dogs”.  At best, they are the dogs of the crazy old coot who lives just outside of town that comes to Walmart on Saturday afternoons with his dogs chained to the flat bed of his F150.

So, we now get to the question about “Guard Dogs”.  What do you have to do to train a dog to be a guard dog?  The first question is if the dog (your student) has the ability to guard.  You don’t want to put your dog through an experience that he will never be able to successfully accomplish.

Let’s  answer this question by looking at a pack of puppies.  They can be Toy Poodles, Spaniels, Boxers, Great Danes, Cane Corsos, Golden Retrievers, or Rotweillers.  Any breed, it doesn’t matter.  If we watch them for a little bit, we can see all the interactive games they are playing.

Sometimes they will be playing follow the leader.  They may be playing tug of war.  They also could be playing king of the hill.  These are all socialization activities. We can equate this experience to our “human kindergarten”.  In most instances, this is all the “training” many owners provide their dogs.

So, when their cute puppies grow up and are now two or three years old, why do they bark when the mailman comes to the door or they hear a strange noise at night?  Aren’t these forms of guarding?  Who taught them that?

This is the question that you should be asking. The answer is quite enlightening and something that is right under your nose.  Robin and I have a great explanation that will make all of this clear. Please read our training blog titled “Do You Train Guard Dogs”.

All dogs guard if you set the proper social environment

Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

Should I Train My Dog Myself or Send Him to a Board and Train?

Should I Train My Dog Myself or Send Him to a Board and Train?

There is always an ongoing debate if training your dog yourself or sending your dog to a Canine Board and Train facility for a few weeks is the best.  Each seem the same because the “hopeful and assumed” end result of each process is having a well-trained family dog.

We can look at this question in many ways.  The first way is to assume that “if it costs more, it must be better”.  I can guarantee you that Board and Train programs are always far more expensive than in home training. So, Board and Train programs are better, right?

Besides that, my dog is immersed in learning all the right stuff while being directed and guided by a staff of qualified, professional dog trainers.  Day in and day out he is focused on obedience.  When he leaves the Board and Train facility and comes home, he is going to be perfect, right?

In many respects, this could build a strong case for Canine Board and Train Facilities.  Board and Train Facilities and their trainers can easily achieve the proper mechanics of obedience and appropriate behavior for your dog.  What they can not achieve is the continuance of your dog’s good behavior and obedience.

So, what’s missing? If you can’t get that from a Board and Train program, can you get it from an In-Home Training program?  Robin and I have a great blog that will dig down into the core requirements of training your dog.  Please check out our dog training blog titled” Should I Train My Dog Myself or Send Him to a Board and Train”.

Board and Train your dog or have In-Home Dog Training

Should I Take My Dog to a Dog Park?

Should I Take My Dog to a Dog Park?

Dog parks can be great places to let your dog off their leash, run to their heart’s content, and just be a dog.  We have pictures in our heads of all the dogs getting along and playing nicely.  But is that really the case all the time?

If we don’t have a big back yard or there aren’t a lot of neighborhood dogs for play dates, dog parks seem like the obvious choice.  In most instances, most dog owners bring their dogs to the park for those reasons.  The problem lies in the fact that many people bring their dogs to the dog park for other reasons.

Over the years I have often seen many well intended dog owners bring their dogs to the dog park for “not the best reasons”.  One of my favorite “not a great reasons” is that the dog is somewhat fearful of strange dogs and the owner thinks that if he brings his dog to the dog park and let him out with the other dogs, a miracle will occur and everything will be fixed.

Some dog owners bring their dog to the park because the dog needs to “get his energy out”.  Well, that “getting the energy out” comes at the expense of other dogs in the park.

Since dog parks are normally public places, there are very few rules and constraints to it’s use.  That means that you need to “self-police” the situation to assure that you and your dog will be safe in that environment.  This becomes even more critical because your dog will not be on a leash and you will have little control over any situations that start to become problematic.

Don’t worry.  There is a way to prepare for the dog park and manage the situation. Robin and I have a great dog training article that will detail what you need to do. Please take a look at our training article titled “ Should I Take My Dog to a Dog Park”.

Take your dog to tyhe dog park

What Should I Do If a Dog Chases Me on My Bike?

What Should I Do If a Dog Chases Me on My Bike?

Back in my day, and that day is a pretty long time ago, the first indication of your personal freedom was when you got your first bicycle.  That meant you could then go see your friends who lived more than a block or two away.  You could also play longer before dinner because the bike could get you home really, really fast.

Having a bike was great!  We learned about watching out for cars and to be careful when people were walking on the sidewalks and that we should keep both hands on the handlebars.  If we had a ten-speed bike, we also learned (normally the hard way) which break handle to squeeze first so that we could safely stop.

Then, came that fateful day that most of us still remember.  The day when we were happily riding our bicycle to our friend’s house and a neighbor dog comes out from behind their house.  He is running straight for us and barking like we did something wrong.  We had no idea what was going on because we were just riding our bike.  That dog never came after us when we were just walking by.

Well, he gets up to us and starts nipping.  We try and go faster, and he finds more “doggie energy” to go faster too.  We try to turn left and right and he follows barking and trying to nip..

To this day, we really don’t have a great solution for these crazy dogs.  Don’t worry, Robin and I can help.  We have a great dog training article that explains why the dog is chasing us and then gives multiple solutions to keep us safe and “unbitten”.  Please take a moment to check out our dog training article titled “What Should I Do If a Dog Chases Me on My Bike”.

Stop Dogs Chasing You When On a Bike

Why Isn’t My Dog Learning His Lessons?

Why Isn’t My Dog Learning His Lessons?

It is so frustrating when we can’t get our dog to learn commands that we think are so simple he should “naturally know them”.  We see our neighbor dogs behaving so well and responding to all the regular doggie commands like “Come”, “Sit”, “Stay”, and “Walk”.  The only thing that our dog can do is “Don’t Pay Attention to Me”.

It isn’t that our dog can’t learn or doesn’t want to learn.  All dogs want to please us, and they really want to positively respond to our wishes.  Being social animals, they have a natural need to fit in with the rest of the group.  They want to know the rules and norms.  They want to be a part of the group activities. This is all based upon their ability to know what we want them to do.

The problem lies in a break between our commands and their ability to appropriately respond to those commands.  It is centered on what our dog has the ability to currently learn and our ability to teach them the appropriate lesson.  Let me clarify this point by giving an example of when we were in grade school.

Let’s say that we were called to the black board to work a math problem that the teacher had just written.  We go to the board and can only get through part of the problem.  At that point we had failed the problem.  Our teacher now comes over and helps us understand what to do next.  All of a sudden, we can answer the problem!

Our teacher understood where she needed to show and guide (teach) us to allow us to proceed to the correct answer.  This is what many of our clients are lacking in their teaching process.  Robin and I have a great article that walks you through the process by presenting a simple dog training lesson and the teaching steps involved in success.  Please read our article titled “Why Isn’t My Dog Learning His Lessons”.

Training My Dog

What Are Some Great Crate Training Tips?

What Are Some Great Crate Training Tips?

The use of crates has always been a very large point of contention among many dog owners.  Some dog owners swear that crates are great and that their dogs love their crates.  Other dog owners are positive that dog crates are nothing more than jails and horrible places to put their dogs.  They even get mad if you bring up the subject of crates.

So, what is the “real deal”.  Do dog crates get a thumbs up or do they take a thumbs down?  First of all, we need to understand that the crate is nothing more than a tool.  Like any tools, they can be used properly and do good things.  They can be used improperly and do bad things or even break things.

The crate can only be used for positive things.  Anything that can provide a constructive and understandable teaching moment are great uses for crates.  Things like potty training where we can use the crate for consistency and encouraging natural instincts is a great use of the crate.  Using the crate in situations where we will enhance our dog’s feeling of safety and security are also great uses of the dog crate.

The misconception that the crate is “bad” is often developed out of our (human) fear of being contained in a controlled place.  We often call this “jail”.  From a “human point of view”, this would be a natural reaction to the crate.  But, we need to understand that this exercise is based on determining the crate’s relevance from our dog’s point of view.  Dog’s often consider the crate as their den, their happy place, and the safest place on earth.

So, what are some tips that we can share regarding our dog and their dog crate?  Robin and I have some great suggestions that will help you effectively use the crate as a great learning and safety tool.  Please read our dog training article titled “What Are Some Great Crate Training Tips”.

Dog crates are great dog training tools.

Do You Train Guard Dogs?

Do You Train Guard Dogs?

When most people think of a “Guard Dog” they think of a big and scary German Shepherd jumping at the fence with big signs “Beware of Dog”.  These are the dogs you would obviously not want in your living room sitting next to your family or at the door when you are letting your friends in to watch the game.

Most of us believe that “guard dogs” could never be “family dogs”.  At best, they are the dogs of the crazy old coot who lives just outside of town that comes to Walmart on Saturday afternoons with his dogs chained to the flat bed of his F150.

So, we now get to the question about “Guard Dogs”.  What do you have to do to train a dog to be a guard dog?  The first question is if the dog (your student) has the ability to guard.  You don’t want to put your dog through an experience that he will never be able to successfully accomplish.

Let’s  answer this question by looking at a pack of puppies.  They can be Toy Poodles, Spaniels, Boxers, Great Danes, Cane Corsos, Golden Retrievers, or Rotweillers.  Any breed, it doesn’t matter.  If we watch them for a little bit, we can see all the interactive games they are playing.

Sometimes they will be playing follow the leader.  They may be playing tug of war.  They also could be playing king of the hill.  These are all socialization activities. We can equate this experience to our “human kindergarten”.  In most instances, this is all the “training” many owners provide their dogs.

So, when their cute puppies grow up and are now two or three years old, why do they bark when the mailman comes to the door or they hear a strange noise at night?  Aren’t these forms of guarding?  Who taught them that?

This is the question that you should be asking. The answer is quite enlightening and something that is right under your nose.  Robin and I have a great explanation that will make all of this clear. Please read our training blog titled “Do You Train Guard Dogs”.

All dogs guard if you set the proper social environment