Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

How Do I Get My Big and Crazy Dog to Behave on a Walk?

There seems to be nothing more iconic than seeing dogs and their owners out for a neighborhood walk or taking our dog out for a walk after we get home and before dinner time.  We look through the neighborhood and see all types of dogs on leashes walking with their masters, enjoying the fresh air, checking out all the smells (normally the dog), and greeting neighbors.

But, what happens when our dog is just completely nuts, pulls the leash, tries to chase everything, knocks us down, and possibly hurts us?  What if we have tried everything we could have imagined to stop our dog’s bad behavior and disrespect only to discover that things are getting worse?  Do we have to give up our walks, stay inside, and glance through the front windows only to see our neighbors and their dogs having wonderful walks?

Well, the answer is “No”.  First of all, this article assumes that your dog is not only crazy (as described above), but also big.  That inference would have been drawn from the discussion of your possible injuries while walking your dog.   When we have big and crazy dogs, they normally act out by doing “big and crazy” things to us.  The super strong pulling, not paying attention, and seemingly unending amount of adrenaline are all descriptions of our dog while on the walk.

We need to counteract these actions if we ever expect to have a calm and happy walk with our dog.  The problem is that when we are confronted with “high energy and force”, we normally respond with “high energy and force”.  We do thing that normally increase our dog’s adrenaline and even (unknown to us) encourage their crazy behavior.

We need to respond and even proactively act in such a way that will teach our dog what is right, regain their focus, and calm them down.  We need to create our own learning environment that brings the focus back to us and away from the “continual craziness” of our dog.

Robin and I have a great dog training article that provides a great exercise to counteract your dog’s crazy, adrenalized behavior while walking.  We have used it many times with great success.  Please take a moment to read our article titled “How Do I Get My Big and Crazy Dog to Behave on a Walk”.

Walking a Crazy Big Dog

Why Does My Dog Potty In The House As Soon As I Bring Him Inside?

I talk a lot about Potty Training in my blogs for a very important reason.  As dog trainers, Robin and I have experienced many puppies and dogs being surrendered to shelters because the dog was “messing up the carpets” or “ruining the hardwood floors”.  I am sorry, but these are not valid reasons to give up on your puppy or dog.

Potty Training is the first, big test that most of us “dog owners” experience when we bring our new canine family member home.  Instead of teaching them Come, Sit, or Stay where you can practice for a while and initial failure isn’t a big deal; potty training is different.  We need to get this behavior under control as quickly as possible or our lives and home will be in shambles.

We normally believe that it isn’t that big a deal.  Take the dog out every few hours and them bring them back.  Easy-peasy.  We believe that there is something “magical” in our dog’s brain and bladder that tell them when and where to potty.  No, that isn’t the case.

This brings us to the situation where we may have been working getting gout dog out for pottying and, low and behold, things are starting to work.  He is starting to go outside.  But then, he isn’t.  We can’t figure out what happened from “success to failure”.

The problem is that we were getting lucky and were not being as focused on the situation as needed.  We were going through some motions that happened to work.  When they stopped working, we didn’t know how to adjust our actions to get things back on track.

This is where Robin and I can enter to help.  When you take your dog out and they don’t go to the bathroom or you take them out, they go, and then go again when you bring them in; what’s the deal?  We have a great dog training article that walks through the steps of what you should be doing and what you should be observing.  Please read our dog training blog titled “Why Does My Dog Potty In The House As Soon As I Bring Him Inside”.

Potty Training

What Are Some Tips for My Dog’s Separation Anxiety?

One of the more complicated issues to resolve when it comes to your dog’s misbehavior is the problem of separation anxiety.  The problem is that it can take many physical forms.  Many times those actions that you would assume are caused by separation anxiety are actually triggered by other physical or interactive issues.

The first thing that you need to understand that separation anxiety is causes by events and relationships that began far before you may see the first indication of the problem.  It is important to understand that if your dog’s bad behavior is caused by separation anxiety, your corrective measures will be different than if you were only dealing with a misbehaving dog chewing something or barking all day.

Robin and I have always stated that the most important part of any human-canine relationship is the bond, structure, trust, and consistency that you and your dog establish.  What is the pecking order and what are the rules help create a safe environment for your dog.  These are the base objectives that must be established when beginning to deal with separation anxiety.

As you can see, the proper identification of your dog’s problem may result in very different courses of action in creating a happy and well-behaved dog.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that lays out the environment you need to create and provides examples of actions you must take in helping your dog through separation anxiety.

Please read our article titled “What Are Some Tips for My Dog’s Separation Anxiety”.  Also remember that all that barking may only be caused by the mail man coming to the door or the school bus letting all the neighborhood kids out right in front of your house.

Socialization Anxiety

How Do I Socialize My Dog When I Don’t Have Many Visitors?

I know that it is just me, but I have no problem being “greeted” at the front door by an exuberant and somewhat crazy dog.  That is because I can quickly read their body language and determine their true intentions.  This is not true with almost all the rest of the people coming through your front door.

When the front door opens and you are confronted with a dog (big or small) barking and running at you, you normally opt for the worst-case scenario that you are about to be bitten.  This is almost never the case, but it still is not the greeting that you, as the homeowner, friend, and host, want to deliver to your guest.

So, as a responsible dog owner, you want to properly train your dog to be fine with people and not to go nuts every time they come in the house or even just around you.  The obvious answer would be to practice with friends when they come over through socialization and repetitive behavior redirection exercises.  Easy-peasy.

But, what if you don’t have a lot of friends or guests over to your home?  You have no “Guiney Pigs” for your dog’s “classroom show-and-tell”.  How can you teach your dog something when you can’t give him the proper textbook?

Teaching your dog to be fine and not go crazy with other people is a socialization technique that does not need to be done specifically in the home.  As long as the proper stimuli are present for teaching, the appropriate lesson can be learned.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that will walk you through the process.  Please check out our dog training blog titled “How Do I Socialize My Dog When I Don’t Have Many Visitors”.

How do I socialize my dog witn I don't have visitors

How do I Teach My Fearful Dog to Walk on a Leash?

When it comes to dogs, we often think that they just know things and understand what they have to do.  Maybe this is because we have seen our neighbors with well-behaved dogs or watched dogs on TV do really great things.

We think that, when we get a dog, they will just “know stuff”.  We often think that if we put a leash on them, they know that they will have to walk with us, not pull on the leash, and behave around others.  We, of course, think this is what will happen.  When this doesn’t happen, we often have no idea what to do.

What makes matters worse is when our dog is afraid of walking.  He may even be afraid of the sight of a leash or a collar or a harness.  He may start to go nuts and misbehave before we can even get him ready for a walk.

Simply forcing our dog to walk by pulling him down the street is never the answer.  At best, he may begrudgingly follow us.  But he will remain fearful and may even become frightened when he is near us.

As a good teacher, you will need to understand your dog’s short comings and incorporate them into a proper training program.  Robin and I have a great dog training blog that you should read. Please have a look at our dog training article titled “How do I Teach My Fearful Dog to Walk on a Leash”.

How do I get my fearful dog to walk on a leash

How Do I Stop My Dog from Stealing Food from The Table?

Our dog’s natural attraction to food comes out of his instinct for safety and preservation.  Food is something that he needs to survive.  The issue that we have with our dog’s instinct is that he doesn’t understand that the food is often ours and not his.

We put food in our dog’s food bowl, give him chew toys and toss him doggie treats.  We give our dog food all the time.  We also put our Pot Roast out on the dining room table and call the family to dinner. We then get mad if our dog jumps up on one of the chairs to “share in the feast”.  Well, that is just wrong; but why?

From our dog’s perspective, we give food and he takes it.  When we leave the Pot Roast on the table and go off to retrieve our kids for dinner, he thinks we are just putting more food down for him.

The problem is that we have not communicated the terms of “ownership” to our dog regarding the food.  We have not clearly stated his position in our group (family, pack, etc.) and the difference between “being allowed” and “taking something that is not yours”.

If you have multiple dogs, watch them when you feed them or give them treats.  They clearly let the others know if they are going to keep, share, or abandon.  The interaction that you are witnessing is part of a social communication that can be traced back to their “wolf origins”.  It is what keeps “things running smoothly” and allows “everyone to have theirs”.

Robin and I have a great dog training blog that will walk you through the process and give you a great training exercise to keep your Pot Roast safe on the dinner table.  Please take a moment to read our article titled “How Do I Stop My Dog from Stealing Food from the Table”.

Stop Your Dog from Stealing from the Table

Feeding your dog Life’s Abundance Premium Dog Food is a great step in the right direction of providing him with the bond and safety he craves and needs.  In addition, obedience and behavior training is very important in assuring that you have a great dog for life and the proper companion for the entire family.

We would like to share some of the articles we have written over the years and continue to write regarding dog safety, obedience, and behavior.  We hope you enjoy them.

How Do I Get My Big and Crazy Dog to Behave on a Walk?

There seems to be nothing more iconic than seeing dogs and their owners out for a neighborhood walk or taking our dog out for a walk after we get home and before dinner time.  We look through the neighborhood and see all types of dogs on leashes walking with their masters, enjoying the fresh air, checking out all the smells (normally the dog), and greeting neighbors.

But, what happens when our dog is just completely nuts, pulls the leash, tries to chase everything, knocks us down, and possibly hurts us?  What if we have tried everything we could have imagined to stop our dog’s bad behavior and disrespect only to discover that things are getting worse?  Do we have to give up our walks, stay inside, and glance through the front windows only to see our neighbors and their dogs having wonderful walks?

Well, the answer is “No”.  First of all, this article assumes that your dog is not only crazy (as described above), but also big.  That inference would have been drawn from the discussion of your possible injuries while walking your dog.   When we have big and crazy dogs, they normally act out by doing “big and crazy” things to us.  The super strong pulling, not paying attention, and seemingly unending amount of adrenaline are all descriptions of our dog while on the walk.

We need to counteract these actions if we ever expect to have a calm and happy walk with our dog.  The problem is that when we are confronted with “high energy and force”, we normally respond with “high energy and force”.  We do thing that normally increase our dog’s adrenaline and even (unknown to us) encourage their crazy behavior.

We need to respond and even proactively act in such a way that will teach our dog what is right, regain their focus, and calm them down.  We need to create our own learning environment that brings the focus back to us and away from the “continual craziness” of our dog.

Robin and I have a great dog training article that provides a great exercise to counteract your dog’s crazy, adrenalized behavior while walking.  We have used it many times with great success.  Please take a moment to read our article titled “How Do I Get My Big and Crazy Dog to Behave on a Walk”.

Walking a Crazy Big Dog

Why Does My Dog Potty In The House As Soon As I Bring Him Inside?

I talk a lot about Potty Training in my blogs for a very important reason.  As dog trainers, Robin and I have experienced many puppies and dogs being surrendered to shelters because the dog was “messing up the carpets” or “ruining the hardwood floors”.  I am sorry, but these are not valid reasons to give up on your puppy or dog.

Potty Training is the first, big test that most of us “dog owners” experience when we bring our new canine family member home.  Instead of teaching them Come, Sit, or Stay where you can practice for a while and initial failure isn’t a big deal; potty training is different.  We need to get this behavior under control as quickly as possible or our lives and home will be in shambles.

We normally believe that it isn’t that big a deal.  Take the dog out every few hours and them bring them back.  Easy-peasy.  We believe that there is something “magical” in our dog’s brain and bladder that tell them when and where to potty.  No, that isn’t the case.

This brings us to the situation where we may have been working getting gout dog out for pottying and, low and behold, things are starting to work.  He is starting to go outside.  But then, he isn’t.  We can’t figure out what happened from “success to failure”.

The problem is that we were getting lucky and were not being as focused on the situation as needed.  We were going through some motions that happened to work.  When they stopped working, we didn’t know how to adjust our actions to get things back on track.

This is where Robin and I can enter to help.  When you take your dog out and they don’t go to the bathroom or you take them out, they go, and then go again when you bring them in; what’s the deal?  We have a great dog training article that walks through the steps of what you should be doing and what you should be observing.  Please read our dog training blog titled “Why Does My Dog Potty In The House As Soon As I Bring Him Inside”.

Potty Training

What Are Some Tips for My Dog’s Separation Anxiety?

One of the more complicated issues to resolve when it comes to your dog’s misbehavior is the problem of separation anxiety.  The problem is that it can take many physical forms.  Many times those actions that you would assume are caused by separation anxiety are actually triggered by other physical or interactive issues.

The first thing that you need to understand that separation anxiety is causes by events and relationships that began far before you may see the first indication of the problem.  It is important to understand that if your dog’s bad behavior is caused by separation anxiety, your corrective measures will be different than if you were only dealing with a misbehaving dog chewing something or barking all day.

Robin and I have always stated that the most important part of any human-canine relationship is the bond, structure, trust, and consistency that you and your dog establish.  What is the pecking order and what are the rules help create a safe environment for your dog.  These are the base objectives that must be established when beginning to deal with separation anxiety.

As you can see, the proper identification of your dog’s problem may result in very different courses of action in creating a happy and well-behaved dog.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that lays out the environment you need to create and provides examples of actions you must take in helping your dog through separation anxiety.

Please read our article titled “What Are Some Tips for My Dog’s Separation Anxiety”.  Also remember that all that barking may only be caused by the mail man coming to the door or the school bus letting all the neighborhood kids out right in front of your house.

Socialization Anxiety

How Do I Socialize My Dog When I Don’t Have Many Visitors?

I know that it is just me, but I have no problem being “greeted” at the front door by an exuberant and somewhat crazy dog.  That is because I can quickly read their body language and determine their true intentions.  This is not true with almost all the rest of the people coming through your front door.

When the front door opens and you are confronted with a dog (big or small) barking and running at you, you normally opt for the worst-case scenario that you are about to be bitten.  This is almost never the case, but it still is not the greeting that you, as the homeowner, friend, and host, want to deliver to your guest.

So, as a responsible dog owner, you want to properly train your dog to be fine with people and not to go nuts every time they come in the house or even just around you.  The obvious answer would be to practice with friends when they come over through socialization and repetitive behavior redirection exercises.  Easy-peasy.

But, what if you don’t have a lot of friends or guests over to your home?  You have no “Guiney Pigs” for your dog’s “classroom show-and-tell”.  How can you teach your dog something when you can’t give him the proper textbook?

Teaching your dog to be fine and not go crazy with other people is a socialization technique that does not need to be done specifically in the home.  As long as the proper stimuli are present for teaching, the appropriate lesson can be learned.  Robin and I have a great dog training article that will walk you through the process.  Please check out our dog training blog titled “How Do I Socialize My Dog When I Don’t Have Many Visitors”.

How do I socialize my dog witn I don't have visitors

How do I Teach My Fearful Dog to Walk on a Leash?

When it comes to dogs, we often think that they just know things and understand what they have to do.  Maybe this is because we have seen our neighbors with well-behaved dogs or watched dogs on TV do really great things.

We think that, when we get a dog, they will just “know stuff”.  We often think that if we put a leash on them, they know that they will have to walk with us, not pull on the leash, and behave around others.  We, of course, think this is what will happen.  When this doesn’t happen, we often have no idea what to do.

What makes matters worse is when our dog is afraid of walking.  He may even be afraid of the sight of a leash or a collar or a harness.  He may start to go nuts and misbehave before we can even get him ready for a walk.

Simply forcing our dog to walk by pulling him down the street is never the answer.  At best, he may begrudgingly follow us.  But he will remain fearful and may even become frightened when he is near us.

As a good teacher, you will need to understand your dog’s short comings and incorporate them into a proper training program.  Robin and I have a great dog training blog that you should read. Please have a look at our dog training article titled “How do I Teach My Fearful Dog to Walk on a Leash”.

How do I get my fearful dog to walk on a leash

How Do I Stop My Dog from Stealing Food from The Table?

Our dog’s natural attraction to food comes out of his instinct for safety and preservation.  Food is something that he needs to survive.  The issue that we have with our dog’s instinct is that he doesn’t understand that the food is often ours and not his.

We put food in our dog’s food bowl, give him chew toys and toss him doggie treats.  We give our dog food all the time.  We also put our Pot Roast out on the dining room table and call the family to dinner. We then get mad if our dog jumps up on one of the chairs to “share in the feast”.  Well, that is just wrong; but why?

From our dog’s perspective, we give food and he takes it.  When we leave the Pot Roast on the table and go off to retrieve our kids for dinner, he thinks we are just putting more food down for him.

The problem is that we have not communicated the terms of “ownership” to our dog regarding the food.  We have not clearly stated his position in our group (family, pack, etc.) and the difference between “being allowed” and “taking something that is not yours”.

If you have multiple dogs, watch them when you feed them or give them treats.  They clearly let the others know if they are going to keep, share, or abandon.  The interaction that you are witnessing is part of a social communication that can be traced back to their “wolf origins”.  It is what keeps “things running smoothly” and allows “everyone to have theirs”.

Robin and I have a great dog training blog that will walk you through the process and give you a great training exercise to keep your Pot Roast safe on the dinner table.  Please take a moment to read our article titled “How Do I Stop My Dog from Stealing Food from the Table”.

Stop Your Dog from Stealing from the Table